The Relationship between Anxiety Genes and Distress in Children Undergoing Venipuncture

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160106
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Relationship between Anxiety Genes and Distress in Children Undergoing Venipuncture
Abstract:
The Relationship between Anxiety Genes and Distress in Children Undergoing Venipuncture
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Schutte, Debra, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Iowa
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, Room 484 NB, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA
Contact Telephone:319-384-4700
Co-Authors:Milena Floria-Santos, PhD, RN, Post Doctoral Fellow; Ann Marie McCarthy, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor; Charmaine Kleiber, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Professor; and Kirsten Hanrahan, MSN, RN, Project Director
Children undergoing venipuncture demonstrate variable levels of distress, despite the use of topical anesthetics. Child characteristics, including genotype, as well as parent and environmental factors are hypothesized to influence distress response in children undergoing these procedures. However, little is known about the role of genes in anxiety and distress response in this population. The purpose of this project, conducted as part of a larger study to test a distraction intervention, was to identify anxiety-related genes that predict variation in child response to venipuncture. Three hundred thirty-five children (age 4-10 years), scheduled for an IV insertion prior to a diagnostic procedure, and their parents were recruited from outpatient settings. Cheek swabs for DNA extraction were collected from the children and available biological parents. Measures of child response to the venipuncture included: 1) child self-report measure of pain (OUCHER Scale), 2) behavioral measure of child distress (OSBD-R), and 3) parent report of child distress. All subjects were genotyped, using PCR techniques, for a single SNP in each of the following candidate genes for anxiety: Serotonin Transporter, Serotonin 5HT-6 Receptor, and Dopamine Receptor D3 genes. A principal components analysis was used to determine a composite distress score. Transmission disequilibrium tests, using Chi-squared methodology, are underway to determine the extent to which the observed transmission ratio of gene variants from parent to children of high and low distress phenotypes differs from the expected 50:50 ratio. Additional group comparisons will be completed to examine the relationship between genetic variants and other child characteristics on self-reported and observed child distress. Results from this study will contribute to our understanding of the genetic basis of pain and distress, enabling the development and evaluation of more targeted and effective interventions. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Relationship between Anxiety Genes and Distress in Children Undergoing Venipunctureen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160106-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Relationship between Anxiety Genes and Distress in Children Undergoing Venipuncture</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Schutte, Debra, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Iowa</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, Room 484 NB, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">319-384-4700</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">debra-schutte@uiowa.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Milena Floria-Santos, PhD, RN, Post Doctoral Fellow; Ann Marie McCarthy, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor; Charmaine Kleiber, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Professor; and Kirsten Hanrahan, MSN, RN, Project Director</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Children undergoing venipuncture demonstrate variable levels of distress, despite the use of topical anesthetics. Child characteristics, including genotype, as well as parent and environmental factors are hypothesized to influence distress response in children undergoing these procedures. However, little is known about the role of genes in anxiety and distress response in this population. The purpose of this project, conducted as part of a larger study to test a distraction intervention, was to identify anxiety-related genes that predict variation in child response to venipuncture. Three hundred thirty-five children (age 4-10 years), scheduled for an IV insertion prior to a diagnostic procedure, and their parents were recruited from outpatient settings. Cheek swabs for DNA extraction were collected from the children and available biological parents. Measures of child response to the venipuncture included: 1) child self-report measure of pain (OUCHER Scale), 2) behavioral measure of child distress (OSBD-R), and 3) parent report of child distress. All subjects were genotyped, using PCR techniques, for a single SNP in each of the following candidate genes for anxiety: Serotonin Transporter, Serotonin 5HT-6 Receptor, and Dopamine Receptor D3 genes. A principal components analysis was used to determine a composite distress score. Transmission disequilibrium tests, using Chi-squared methodology, are underway to determine the extent to which the observed transmission ratio of gene variants from parent to children of high and low distress phenotypes differs from the expected 50:50 ratio. Additional group comparisons will be completed to examine the relationship between genetic variants and other child characteristics on self-reported and observed child distress. Results from this study will contribute to our understanding of the genetic basis of pain and distress, enabling the development and evaluation of more targeted and effective interventions. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:37:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:37:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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