2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160113
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Heart Rate Variability Responses of a Preterm Infant to Kangaroo Care
Abstract:
Heart Rate Variability Responses of a Preterm Infant to Kangaroo Care
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Ludington, Susan, CNM, PhD, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:Nursing Department, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA
Contact Telephone:216.368.5130
Co-Authors:Gail C. McCain, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Professor and Joan Y Swinth, BSN, RN, Project Coordinator
Purpose: This case study describes one preterm infant's heart rate
variability (HRV) and behavioral responses to a session of kangaroo care
(KC) (skin-to-skin care) with his mother. Framework: HRV is a noninvasive
method to assess the autonomic nervous system's influence on
cardio-respiratory control in preterm infants. Heart rate, measured by
counting the heart beats/minute is a net effect of the decelerating
influence of the vagal (parasympathetic) fibers, and the accelerating
influence of the sympathetic fibers on the inherent rhythmicity of the
heart's sinoatrial node. Subject: Infant boy B was borne at 34 weeks
gestation and weighed 2586 grams. His mother was an 18 year old Caucasian
primipara who was hospitalized because of premature rupture of membranes
at 28 weeks gestation, and remained on bed rest for 6-weeks until
delivery. Methods: The infant was observed for 40-minutes in an open crib
followed by 40-minutes in KC. Behavioral state was observed every minute
with the Anderson Behavioral State Scale. An EKG signal from a
cardio-respiratory monitor to a computer with HRV software was
continuously obtained during data collection. The data were analyzed with
descriptive statistics. Results: The infant's behavior was fussy and
restless in the open crib, but he calmed and fell asleep immediately on
being placed skin-to-skin on his mother's chest. The infant's HRV indices
were increased with fussy behavior in the open crib and decreased with
sleep during KC. However, the infant had normal levels of sympathetic
activity and very high levels of parasympathetic activity. This inability
to inhibit the vagal system response is likely due to immaturity.
Conclusions: KC produced changes in behavior and HRV that are illustrative
of decreasing stress and immaturity of the autonomic nervous system
respectively.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHeart Rate Variability Responses of a Preterm Infant to Kangaroo Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160113-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Heart Rate Variability Responses of a Preterm Infant to Kangaroo Care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ludington, Susan, CNM, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing Department, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216.368.5130</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sml15@case.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Gail C. McCain, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Professor and Joan Y Swinth, BSN, RN, Project Coordinator</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This case study describes one preterm infant's heart rate <br/> variability (HRV) and behavioral responses to a session of kangaroo care <br/> (KC) (skin-to-skin care) with his mother. Framework: HRV is a noninvasive <br/> method to assess the autonomic nervous system's influence on <br/> cardio-respiratory control in preterm infants. Heart rate, measured by <br/> counting the heart beats/minute is a net effect of the decelerating <br/> influence of the vagal (parasympathetic) fibers, and the accelerating <br/> influence of the sympathetic fibers on the inherent rhythmicity of the <br/> heart's sinoatrial node. Subject: Infant boy B was borne at 34 weeks <br/> gestation and weighed 2586 grams. His mother was an 18 year old Caucasian <br/> primipara who was hospitalized because of premature rupture of membranes <br/> at 28 weeks gestation, and remained on bed rest for 6-weeks until <br/> delivery. Methods: The infant was observed for 40-minutes in an open crib <br/> followed by 40-minutes in KC. Behavioral state was observed every minute <br/> with the Anderson Behavioral State Scale. An EKG signal from a <br/> cardio-respiratory monitor to a computer with HRV software was <br/> continuously obtained during data collection. The data were analyzed with <br/> descriptive statistics. Results: The infant's behavior was fussy and <br/> restless in the open crib, but he calmed and fell asleep immediately on <br/> being placed skin-to-skin on his mother's chest. The infant's HRV indices <br/> were increased with fussy behavior in the open crib and decreased with <br/> sleep during KC. However, the infant had normal levels of sympathetic <br/> activity and very high levels of parasympathetic activity. This inability <br/> to inhibit the vagal system response is likely due to immaturity. <br/> Conclusions: KC produced changes in behavior and HRV that are illustrative <br/> of decreasing stress and immaturity of the autonomic nervous system <br/> respectively.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:38:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:38:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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