2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160114
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Kangaroo Care Diminishes Preemie Pain
Abstract:
Kangaroo Care Diminishes Preemie Pain
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Ludington, Susan, PhD, CNM, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA
Contact Telephone:216-368-6490
Co-Authors:Robert Hosseini, MD, Clinical Director
Objectives: The purpose of the study was to compare a heel stick
conducted during skin-to-skin contact with the mother to a heel stick in
an warmer in reducing premature infant physiologic and behavioral pain
responses. Study Design: 23 premature infants in a University-based NICU
were recruited and randomized to two sequences: Sequence A group received
three hours of skin-to-skin contact with a heel stick in skin-to-skin
followed by three hours in an warmer with a heel stick in the warmer.
Sequence B group had warmer care and heel stick before skin contact care
and heel stick. Heart rate, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, crying
time and behavioral state were measured before (baseline), during (heel
stick), and after heel stick (post-heel stick). Repeated measures ANOVA
and Mann Whitney U statistics were performed to compare baseline, heel
stick, and post-heel stick data. Results: Heart rate and crying were
significantly reduced during skin-to-skin baseline and heel stick as
compared to warmer care baseline and heel stick periods. Three infants did
not cry at all during the skin contact heel stick. Infants slept more
during skin-to-skin contact than in the warmer. Conclusion: Skin-to-skin
positioning before and during a heel stick is a simple and inexpensive
intervention to ameliorate pain in medically stable premature infants.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleKangaroo Care Diminishes Preemie Painen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160114-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Kangaroo Care Diminishes Preemie Pain</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ludington, Susan, PhD, CNM, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216-368-6490</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Susan.ludington@case.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Robert Hosseini, MD, Clinical Director</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objectives: The purpose of the study was to compare a heel stick <br/> conducted during skin-to-skin contact with the mother to a heel stick in <br/> an warmer in reducing premature infant physiologic and behavioral pain <br/> responses. Study Design: 23 premature infants in a University-based NICU <br/> were recruited and randomized to two sequences: Sequence A group received <br/> three hours of skin-to-skin contact with a heel stick in skin-to-skin <br/> followed by three hours in an warmer with a heel stick in the warmer. <br/> Sequence B group had warmer care and heel stick before skin contact care <br/> and heel stick. Heart rate, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, crying <br/> time and behavioral state were measured before (baseline), during (heel <br/> stick), and after heel stick (post-heel stick). Repeated measures ANOVA <br/> and Mann Whitney U statistics were performed to compare baseline, heel <br/> stick, and post-heel stick data. Results: Heart rate and crying were <br/> significantly reduced during skin-to-skin baseline and heel stick as <br/> compared to warmer care baseline and heel stick periods. Three infants did <br/> not cry at all during the skin contact heel stick. Infants slept more <br/> during skin-to-skin contact than in the warmer. Conclusion: Skin-to-skin <br/> positioning before and during a heel stick is a simple and inexpensive <br/> intervention to ameliorate pain in medically stable premature infants.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:38:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:38:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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