2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160115
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Improved Sleep Organization During Kangaroo Care
Abstract:
Improved Sleep Organization During Kangaroo Care
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Ludington, Susan, PhD, CNM, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA
Contact Telephone:216-368-6490
Co-Authors:Mark Scher, MBA, Professor; Mark Johnson, PhD, Research Analyst; Kathy Morgan, NNP, Project Director; and Tina Lewis, BSN, Research Assistant
Sleep is important to brain organization, but few strategies to
promote sleep in premature infants have been tested. Behaviorally-based
measures of sleep have shown increased quiet sleep and decreased active
sleep during skin-to-skin contact with the mother, but these results have
not been confirmed by objective polysomnographic measures of sleep
organization. Data from the first 28 relatively healthy preterm subjects
of an ongoing randomized trial of one two-to-three hour session of SSC or
incubator care between feedings are reported here. Infants were positioned
prone, upright, and nested in an incubator during the 2-to-3 hour pretest
period, were fed, and then went into the test period of skin-to-skin
contact or incubator care. Infants were left undisturbed throughout
testing and a mixed model regression analysis compared the difference from
pretest-to-test period scores within and between groups. Results show that
arousals in quiet sleep and active sleep and in the test period decrease
in the SSC group, rapid eye movement epochs decrease and the percent of
indeterminate sleep decrease in the SSC group. When 3 subjects who
experienced excessive ambient light levels during SSC were removed from
analysis, quiet sleep increased during SSC. The patterns demonstrated by
the SSC group are analogous to more mature sleep organization. SSC may be
used as an intervention to improve sleep organization in this population
of preterm infants.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImproved Sleep Organization During Kangaroo Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160115-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Improved Sleep Organization During Kangaroo Care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ludington, Susan, PhD, CNM, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216-368-6490</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Susan.ludington@case.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mark Scher, MBA, Professor; Mark Johnson, PhD, Research Analyst; Kathy Morgan, NNP, Project Director; and Tina Lewis, BSN, Research Assistant</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Sleep is important to brain organization, but few strategies to <br/> promote sleep in premature infants have been tested. Behaviorally-based <br/> measures of sleep have shown increased quiet sleep and decreased active <br/> sleep during skin-to-skin contact with the mother, but these results have <br/> not been confirmed by objective polysomnographic measures of sleep <br/> organization. Data from the first 28 relatively healthy preterm subjects <br/> of an ongoing randomized trial of one two-to-three hour session of SSC or <br/> incubator care between feedings are reported here. Infants were positioned <br/> prone, upright, and nested in an incubator during the 2-to-3 hour pretest <br/> period, were fed, and then went into the test period of skin-to-skin <br/> contact or incubator care. Infants were left undisturbed throughout <br/> testing and a mixed model regression analysis compared the difference from <br/> pretest-to-test period scores within and between groups. Results show that <br/> arousals in quiet sleep and active sleep and in the test period decrease <br/> in the SSC group, rapid eye movement epochs decrease and the percent of <br/> indeterminate sleep decrease in the SSC group. When 3 subjects who <br/> experienced excessive ambient light levels during SSC were removed from <br/> analysis, quiet sleep increased during SSC. The patterns demonstrated by <br/> the SSC group are analogous to more mature sleep organization. SSC may be <br/> used as an intervention to improve sleep organization in this population <br/> of preterm infants.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:38:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:38:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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