NursesÆ Decision-making about Nutritional Risk in Patients: A Cross Country Comparison

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160116
Type:
Presentation
Title:
NursesÆ Decision-making about Nutritional Risk in Patients: A Cross Country Comparison
Abstract:
NursesÆ Decision-making about Nutritional Risk in Patients: A Cross Country Comparison
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Ludwick, Ruth, PhD, RN, C, CNS
P.I. Institution Name:Kent State University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, Henderson Hall, Kent, OH, 44242, USA
Contact Telephone:330-672-8820
Co-Authors:Marion E. Wright, PhD, MSc, BS, RN, Lecturer; Rich Zeller, PhD; Dawn W Dowding, PhD, Lecturer; and William Lauder, PhD, Professor
Purpose: Malnutrition rates are high in hospitals and in nursing homes
and nurses are in a key position to impact this problem, but little
experimental work has been done on what factors influence nurse judgments
and decisions about patient nutrition. The purpose of this study was to
examine 11 clinical and socio-demographic patient variables for their
predictability in identifying similarities and differences in nursesÆ
approaches to assessing, screening and referring for nutritional problems.
Framework: A social judgment model, which explains how two or more people
can reach differing conclusions with the same data, was used to frame the
study.
Subjects: Third-year nursing students and post-RNs students (N=166) at 3
universities in the United States, Northern Ireland, and Scotland
completed the study.
Method: This experimental design used factorial surveys. This method
combines elements of a classic experimental design with survey research
and allows researchers to examine variables that are impossible to
disentangle in non-experimental designs. Subjects scored a unique set of 6
randomly generated vignettes in which 11 patient variables were examined
for their effect on decisions.
Results: Analysis of data, using ordinary least squares regression,
determined that over 20% of the variance in each of the 3 dependent
variables were explained by 7 of the independent variables. By far the
greatest explained variance came from the patient self-report of amount of
food eaten in their last meals and, significantly less from objectives
measures, i.e., weight and height, hemoglobin and state of hydration.
Conclusions: In this study nurses used primarily subjective information
about food intake for decisions. This over reliance on subjective data
warrants further investigation on nurses' knowledge and use of nutrition
information especially related to objective clinical data and on the
prevalence of using nutrition screening tools.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursesÆ Decision-making about Nutritional Risk in Patients: A Cross Country Comparisonen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160116-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nurses&AElig; Decision-making about Nutritional Risk in Patients: A Cross Country Comparison</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ludwick, Ruth, PhD, RN, C, CNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Kent State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, Henderson Hall, Kent, OH, 44242, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">330-672-8820</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rludwick@kent.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Marion E. Wright, PhD, MSc, BS, RN, Lecturer; Rich Zeller, PhD; Dawn W Dowding, PhD, Lecturer; and William Lauder, PhD, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Malnutrition rates are high in hospitals and in nursing homes <br/> and nurses are in a key position to impact this problem, but little <br/> experimental work has been done on what factors influence nurse judgments <br/> and decisions about patient nutrition. The purpose of this study was to <br/> examine 11 clinical and socio-demographic patient variables for their <br/> predictability in identifying similarities and differences in nurses&AElig; <br/> approaches to assessing, screening and referring for nutritional problems.<br/> Framework: A social judgment model, which explains how two or more people <br/> can reach differing conclusions with the same data, was used to frame the <br/> study. <br/> Subjects: Third-year nursing students and post-RNs students (N=166) at 3 <br/> universities in the United States, Northern Ireland, and Scotland <br/> completed the study. <br/> Method: This experimental design used factorial surveys. This method <br/> combines elements of a classic experimental design with survey research <br/> and allows researchers to examine variables that are impossible to <br/> disentangle in non-experimental designs. Subjects scored a unique set of 6 <br/> randomly generated vignettes in which 11 patient variables were examined <br/> for their effect on decisions.<br/> Results: Analysis of data, using ordinary least squares regression, <br/> determined that over 20% of the variance in each of the 3 dependent <br/> variables were explained by 7 of the independent variables. By far the <br/> greatest explained variance came from the patient self-report of amount of <br/> food eaten in their last meals and, significantly less from objectives <br/> measures, i.e., weight and height, hemoglobin and state of hydration.<br/> Conclusions: In this study nurses used primarily subjective information <br/> about food intake for decisions. This over reliance on subjective data <br/> warrants further investigation on nurses' knowledge and use of nutrition <br/> information especially related to objective clinical data and on the <br/> prevalence of using nutrition screening tools.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:38:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:38:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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