Use of Longitudinal Surveys to Measure Organization Dimensions of Hospital Nursing Practice

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160118
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Use of Longitudinal Surveys to Measure Organization Dimensions of Hospital Nursing Practice
Abstract:
Use of Longitudinal Surveys to Measure Organization Dimensions of Hospital Nursing Practice
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Martin, Patricia, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Wright State University-Miami Valley
Title:Dean
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 3640 Colonel Glenn Highway, Dayton, OH, 45435, USA
Contact Telephone:937-775-3133
Co-Authors:David E. Uddin, PhD, Director
Purpose: This research addresses organizational communication which
has not been studied extensively in the health professions. Communication
satisfaction is a measure of the individualÆs satisfaction with
information flow. Inadequate communication has been documented as a major
contributing factor that can lead to union activity and increased staffing
costs in healthcare institutions (Lappa, 1989), probably due to its
contribution to both morale and productivity. Researchers have
demonstrated that dissatisfied nurses intend to leave (Atencio et al.,
2003). Framework: Previous research has supported the influence of
organizational dimensions, including nurses' perceptions of their work
environment, on the provision and outcome of nursing (Aiken et al., 2002;
Gallagher & Rowell, 2003). Subjects: Nurses from a pool of 1400 at one
acute care hospital. Methods: Communication Satisfaction was measured with
a shortened version of Downs and Hazen's (1977) Communication Satisfaction
Tool (40 items, Cronbach alpha=0.97) administered annually 1992-2004.
Results: From 1992 through 1995, the mean satisfaction score was
consistently about 3.0 (satisfied), but increased over several years,
reaching a peak in 1998 (not satisfied). ANOVA demonstrated significant
differences over time; MANOVA identified the subscales that should be
addressed; and regression, using demographics, helped target improvements.
Conclusions: Longitudinal assessment of the nurses' perceptions of the
work environment is even more critical to inform the nurse administrators'
judgments and planning during turbulent times. The reported findings can
help nurse administrators design a more positive work environment for
their nurses. Targeted interventions by nursing administration to increase
the volume and methods of communication to staff resulted in sustained
communication effectiveness.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUse of Longitudinal Surveys to Measure Organization Dimensions of Hospital Nursing Practiceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160118-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Use of Longitudinal Surveys to Measure Organization Dimensions of Hospital Nursing Practice</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Martin, Patricia, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wright State University-Miami Valley</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Dean</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 3640 Colonel Glenn Highway, Dayton, OH, 45435, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">937-775-3133</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">patricia.martin@wright.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">David E. Uddin, PhD, Director</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This research addresses organizational communication which <br/> has not been studied extensively in the health professions. Communication <br/> satisfaction is a measure of the individual&AElig;s satisfaction with <br/> information flow. Inadequate communication has been documented as a major <br/> contributing factor that can lead to union activity and increased staffing <br/> costs in healthcare institutions (Lappa, 1989), probably due to its <br/> contribution to both morale and productivity. Researchers have <br/> demonstrated that dissatisfied nurses intend to leave (Atencio et al., <br/> 2003). Framework: Previous research has supported the influence of <br/> organizational dimensions, including nurses' perceptions of their work <br/> environment, on the provision and outcome of nursing (Aiken et al., 2002; <br/> Gallagher &amp; Rowell, 2003). Subjects: Nurses from a pool of 1400 at one <br/> acute care hospital. Methods: Communication Satisfaction was measured with <br/> a shortened version of Downs and Hazen's (1977) Communication Satisfaction <br/> Tool (40 items, Cronbach alpha=0.97) administered annually 1992-2004. <br/> Results: From 1992 through 1995, the mean satisfaction score was <br/> consistently about 3.0 (satisfied), but increased over several years, <br/> reaching a peak in 1998 (not satisfied). ANOVA demonstrated significant <br/> differences over time; MANOVA identified the subscales that should be <br/> addressed; and regression, using demographics, helped target improvements. <br/> Conclusions: Longitudinal assessment of the nurses' perceptions of the <br/> work environment is even more critical to inform the nurse administrators' <br/> judgments and planning during turbulent times. The reported findings can <br/> help nurse administrators design a more positive work environment for <br/> their nurses. Targeted interventions by nursing administration to increase <br/> the volume and methods of communication to staff resulted in sustained <br/> communication effectiveness.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:38:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:38:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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