2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160119
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Breastfeeding Education in University Nursing Programs
Abstract:
Breastfeeding Education in University Nursing Programs
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Marzalik, Penny Rall, PhD, CNM, IBCLC
P.I. Institution Name:Loyola University Chicago
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 2160 South First Avenue, Maywood, IL, 60153, USA
Contact Telephone:708 216-3643
Current statistics regarding breastfeeding rates in the United States
support the need for nursing programs to address the topic of
breastfeeding education. Research has shown that nurses, the largest group
of health care professionals, influence women's breastfeeding experiences.
The literature informs us that although nurses most often have positive
attitudes towards breastfeeding, they lack knowledge about breastfeeding
support. The purpose of this study was to describe the current state of
breastfeeding education in university nursing programs, determine the
knowledge, attitudes, and self-efficacy scores of senior nursing students,
and identify factors associated with higher knowledge and attitude scores.
Albert Bandura's Social cognitive theory, as applied to behavioral change,
provided the theoretical framework for the study. Results from a 78-item
Web-based national survey of 385 senior nursing students from 36 randomly
selected U.S. baccalaureate nursing programs were analyzed. The use of
traditional modalities for teaching and evaluating breastfeeding knowledge
(lecture by nursing faculty, use of a textbook, written test questions)
prevailed. Of greatest surprise and concern, despite low knowledge scores,
students were confident in their ability to support breastfeeding.
Personal breastfeeding intent explained the greatest variance for both
knowledge and attitude scores while program characteristics explained the
least. Instructional characteristics associated with higher knowledge and
attitude scores were feedback to students and student utilization of
social supports such as LaLeche League. Recommendations include structured
feedback from faculty, such as evaluation of the nursing studentÆs
performance on a standardized breastfeeding support simulation and
modeling the use of breastfeeding social supports.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBreastfeeding Education in University Nursing Programsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160119-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Breastfeeding Education in University Nursing Programs</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Marzalik, Penny Rall, PhD, CNM, IBCLC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Loyola University Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 2160 South First Avenue, Maywood, IL, 60153, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">708 216-3643</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pmarzal@luc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Current statistics regarding breastfeeding rates in the United States <br/> support the need for nursing programs to address the topic of <br/> breastfeeding education. Research has shown that nurses, the largest group <br/> of health care professionals, influence women's breastfeeding experiences. <br/> The literature informs us that although nurses most often have positive <br/> attitudes towards breastfeeding, they lack knowledge about breastfeeding <br/> support. The purpose of this study was to describe the current state of <br/> breastfeeding education in university nursing programs, determine the <br/> knowledge, attitudes, and self-efficacy scores of senior nursing students, <br/> and identify factors associated with higher knowledge and attitude scores. <br/> Albert Bandura's Social cognitive theory, as applied to behavioral change, <br/> provided the theoretical framework for the study. Results from a 78-item <br/> Web-based national survey of 385 senior nursing students from 36 randomly <br/> selected U.S. baccalaureate nursing programs were analyzed. The use of <br/> traditional modalities for teaching and evaluating breastfeeding knowledge <br/> (lecture by nursing faculty, use of a textbook, written test questions) <br/> prevailed. Of greatest surprise and concern, despite low knowledge scores, <br/> students were confident in their ability to support breastfeeding. <br/> Personal breastfeeding intent explained the greatest variance for both <br/> knowledge and attitude scores while program characteristics explained the <br/> least. Instructional characteristics associated with higher knowledge and <br/> attitude scores were feedback to students and student utilization of <br/> social supports such as LaLeche League. Recommendations include structured <br/> feedback from faculty, such as evaluation of the nursing student&AElig;s <br/> performance on a standardized breastfeeding support simulation and <br/> modeling the use of breastfeeding social supports.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:38:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:38:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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