African American Baccalaureate Nursing Students' Perceptions of Nursing Programs and Factors that Support or Restrict Academic Success.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160124
Type:
Presentation
Title:
African American Baccalaureate Nursing Students' Perceptions of Nursing Programs and Factors that Support or Restrict Academic Success.
Abstract:
African American Baccalaureate Nursing Students' Perceptions of Nursing Programs and Factors that Support or Restrict Academic Success.
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Mills-Wisneski, Sharon, DNSc, MSN, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Title:Post Doctoral Fellow
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 400 N. Ingalls, Suite 4320, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA
Contact Telephone:734-764-9519
Purpose: Two-fold, first to test specific hypotheses using Bean and
Metzner's (1985) model of Nontraditional Undergraduate Student Attrition
in junior baccalaureate nursing students and second to describe junior
African American baccalaureate nursing students' perceptions of their
nursing programs as well as factors that support or restrict their
academic success. Specific Aims: (1) to examine student behavior as it
relates to retention and academic success in a specific cohort nursing
students, (2) to describe and compare those academic and environmental
factors that support or restrict academic success in the cohort
groups, (3) to determine whether students' perceptions of their BSN programs
influences their motivation to be successful. Methods: Purposive sampling
was used to collect data from a sample of self-identified African
American (black, non-Hispanic) junior BSN (N=152), enrolled in generic BSN
programs located in the North Atlantic and a portion of the Southern NLNAC accrediting regions. Three instruments, the Minority Students' Perceptions of their Educational Programs (MSPEP), the Student Perception
Appraisal (SPA), and the Desirability for Control Scale (DC), and a researcher
designed demographic data sheet were used. Alpha coefficients ranged from
.66 to .84. Data was analyzed used descriptive and inferential methods,
ANOVA to determine whether the variables were statistically different by
schools, along with simple & multiple regression. Results: Perceptions (R=.50;p=.001) significantly explained 25% of
the variance in the composite of academic variables. Seven academic and
five environmental factors were identified as supportive of the students'
academic success. Four environmental factors were identified as
"moderately" restricting academic success. Study participants provided
written comments concerning the lack of minority faculty in the classroom
and clinical areas. Conclusions: age is not significant nor an indicator of
academic success and there is a need for minority faculty to provide
students with role models and mentors. Implications for the workforce: the
delivery of culturally competent care, and nursing education diversity.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAfrican American Baccalaureate Nursing Students' Perceptions of Nursing Programs and Factors that Support or Restrict Academic Success.en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160124-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">African American Baccalaureate Nursing Students' Perceptions of Nursing Programs and Factors that Support or Restrict Academic Success.</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mills-Wisneski, Sharon, DNSc, MSN, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Post Doctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 400 N. Ingalls, Suite 4320, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734-764-9519</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">drwhiz@umich.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Two-fold, first to test specific hypotheses using Bean and <br/> Metzner's (1985) model of Nontraditional Undergraduate Student Attrition <br/> in junior baccalaureate nursing students and second to describe junior <br/> African American baccalaureate nursing students' perceptions of their <br/> nursing programs as well as factors that support or restrict their <br/> academic success. Specific Aims: (1) to examine student behavior as it <br/> relates to retention and academic success in a specific cohort nursing <br/> students, (2) to describe and compare those academic and environmental <br/> factors that support or restrict academic success in the cohort <br/> groups, (3) to determine whether students' perceptions of their BSN programs <br/> influences their motivation to be successful. Methods: Purposive sampling <br/> was used to collect data from a sample of self-identified African <br/> American (black, non-Hispanic) junior BSN (N=152), enrolled in generic BSN <br/> programs located in the North Atlantic and a portion of the Southern NLNAC accrediting regions. Three instruments, the Minority Students' Perceptions of their Educational Programs (MSPEP), the Student Perception <br/> Appraisal (SPA), and the Desirability for Control Scale (DC), and a researcher <br/> designed demographic data sheet were used. Alpha coefficients ranged from <br/> .66 to .84. Data was analyzed used descriptive and inferential methods, <br/> ANOVA to determine whether the variables were statistically different by <br/> schools, along with simple &amp; multiple regression. Results: Perceptions (R=.50;p=.001) significantly explained 25% of <br/> the variance in the composite of academic variables. Seven academic and <br/> five environmental factors were identified as supportive of the students' <br/> academic success. Four environmental factors were identified as <br/> &quot;moderately&quot; restricting academic success. Study participants provided <br/> written comments concerning the lack of minority faculty in the classroom <br/> and clinical areas. Conclusions: age is not significant nor an indicator of <br/> academic success and there is a need for minority faculty to provide <br/> students with role models and mentors. Implications for the workforce: the <br/> delivery of culturally competent care, and nursing education diversity.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:38:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:38:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.