Relationship between goal statement quality of writing and success in a writing-intensive nursing theory course

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160128
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relationship between goal statement quality of writing and success in a writing-intensive nursing theory course
Abstract:
Relationship between goal statement quality of writing and success in a writing-intensive nursing theory course
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Newton, Sarah, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Oakland University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 448 O'Dowd Hall, Rochester, MI, 48309, USA
Contact Telephone:(248) 370-4069
Co-Authors:Gary Moore, PhD, RN, Associate Professor
In order to be successful in graduate school, nursing students must
have the ability to communicate effectively in writing. Written goal
statements are often required as part of the graduate nursing admissions
process. It is not known to what extent these written goal statements
reflect an applicant's ability to write logically and coherently. Using
Classical Learning Theory (Connectionism, n.d.), students should be able
to make a "connection" between the specific requirements of an admission
goal statement and the more abstract writing required in graduate level
courses. As a result, students who demonstrate a high quality of writing
(QOW) on their admission goal statements should be expected to perform
well in graduate level writing courses. The purpose of this study was to
examine the relationship between admission goal statement QOW and final
grades in a first semester graduate level writing-intensive nursing theory
course. Currently enrolled graduate students at one large Midwestern
school of nursing comprised the study sample (N=120). The QOW for each
applicant's admission goal statement was evaluated using criteria
developed by the investigators that resulted in a score ranging from 3-12.
The goal statements were evaluated by each of the studyÆs investigators;
inter-rater reliability was high (t=-.779, p=.438, df=108). Final nursing
theory grades were obtained from the study investigator who taught the
courses. To examine the relationship between applicant QOW and nursing
theory grade, a correlation was calculated (r=.489, p < .01, r2=.239). The
findings of this study support the notion that admission goal statements
are reasonable predictors of writing ability during graduate level
coursework. Additional implications related to the use of written goal
statements for graduate admission purposes will be explored.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelationship between goal statement quality of writing and success in a writing-intensive nursing theory courseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160128-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Relationship between goal statement quality of writing and success in a writing-intensive nursing theory course</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Newton, Sarah, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Oakland University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 448 O'Dowd Hall, Rochester, MI, 48309, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(248) 370-4069</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">newton@oakland.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Gary Moore, PhD, RN, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">In order to be successful in graduate school, nursing students must <br/> have the ability to communicate effectively in writing. Written goal <br/> statements are often required as part of the graduate nursing admissions <br/> process. It is not known to what extent these written goal statements <br/> reflect an applicant's ability to write logically and coherently. Using <br/> Classical Learning Theory (Connectionism, n.d.), students should be able <br/> to make a &quot;connection&quot; between the specific requirements of an admission <br/> goal statement and the more abstract writing required in graduate level <br/> courses. As a result, students who demonstrate a high quality of writing <br/> (QOW) on their admission goal statements should be expected to perform <br/> well in graduate level writing courses. The purpose of this study was to <br/> examine the relationship between admission goal statement QOW and final <br/> grades in a first semester graduate level writing-intensive nursing theory <br/> course. Currently enrolled graduate students at one large Midwestern <br/> school of nursing comprised the study sample (N=120). The QOW for each <br/> applicant's admission goal statement was evaluated using criteria <br/> developed by the investigators that resulted in a score ranging from 3-12. <br/> The goal statements were evaluated by each of the study&AElig;s investigators; <br/> inter-rater reliability was high (t=-.779, p=.438, df=108). Final nursing <br/> theory grades were obtained from the study investigator who taught the <br/> courses. To examine the relationship between applicant QOW and nursing <br/> theory grade, a correlation was calculated (r=.489, p &lt; .01, r2=.239). The <br/> findings of this study support the notion that admission goal statements <br/> are reasonable predictors of writing ability during graduate level <br/> coursework. Additional implications related to the use of written goal <br/> statements for graduate admission purposes will be explored.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:39:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:39:08Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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