2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160134
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hypertension Prevention Beliefs in African Americans
Abstract:
Hypertension Prevention Beliefs in African Americans
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Peters, Rosalind, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA
Contact Telephone:3135770342
Co-Authors:Karen J. Aroian, PhD, MS, BS, RN, Professor and Lynette Hoskins, BSN, RN
Problem: Significant racial disparities exist in the age of onset,
prevalence, and outcomes of hypertension with African Americans bearing a
disproportionate burden of disease. African Americans are less likely to
sustain lifestyle changes necessary to prevent hypertension, yet almost
nothing is known about their beliefs related to these preventive
strategies. Framework/Methodology: The Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB)
guided the semi-structured interviews used in this qualitative study. Five
focus groups were conducted to elicit the emic view regarding hypertension
prevention. Participants included 34 African Americans, between 27 and 60
years of age (M=48, Mdn=47) who were fairly evenly distributed by age and
education, and with income ranging from <$15,000 (24%) to >$50,000
(31%)/year. Participants viewed themselves as quite healthy, with a
perceived low to moderate risk of developing hypertension, kidney disease,
stroke, and diabetes. Verbatim transcripts were used for thematic
analysis. A loosely constructed a priori coding scheme based on the TBP
identified the salient behavioral, normative, and control beliefs
influencing behavior. Findings. Themes related to behavioral beliefs
revealed participants to be knowledgeable about causes and consequences of
hypertension, but having less knowledge regarding prevention options.
Participants reported few choices for dealing with chronic stress, and
negatively evaluated dietary changes and increasing exercise. Normative
belief themes revealed a consistent sense that the participants' social
groups would disapprove of the person engaging in preventive lifestyle
strategies, especially changing dietary practices. Data regarding control
beliefs indicated that participants had significant concerns regarding
external factors (e.g., time, social support) with fewer concerns
regarding internal factors (e.g., skill, information). Implications:
Findings will assist nurses to conduct more thorough assessments of
prevention beliefs and social supports of African Americans at risk for
hypertension. Using more group-oriented intervention strategies to
increase social support for preventive behaviors may improve outcomes in
this population.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHypertension Prevention Beliefs in African Americansen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160134-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Hypertension Prevention Beliefs in African Americans</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Peters, Rosalind, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">3135770342</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ad7736@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Karen J. Aroian, PhD, MS, BS, RN, Professor and Lynette Hoskins, BSN, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Significant racial disparities exist in the age of onset, <br/> prevalence, and outcomes of hypertension with African Americans bearing a <br/> disproportionate burden of disease. African Americans are less likely to <br/> sustain lifestyle changes necessary to prevent hypertension, yet almost <br/> nothing is known about their beliefs related to these preventive <br/> strategies. Framework/Methodology: The Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) <br/> guided the semi-structured interviews used in this qualitative study. Five <br/> focus groups were conducted to elicit the emic view regarding hypertension <br/> prevention. Participants included 34 African Americans, between 27 and 60 <br/> years of age (M=48, Mdn=47) who were fairly evenly distributed by age and <br/> education, and with income ranging from &lt;$15,000 (24%) to &gt;$50,000 <br/> (31%)/year. Participants viewed themselves as quite healthy, with a <br/> perceived low to moderate risk of developing hypertension, kidney disease, <br/> stroke, and diabetes. Verbatim transcripts were used for thematic <br/> analysis. A loosely constructed a priori coding scheme based on the TBP <br/> identified the salient behavioral, normative, and control beliefs <br/> influencing behavior. Findings. Themes related to behavioral beliefs <br/> revealed participants to be knowledgeable about causes and consequences of <br/> hypertension, but having less knowledge regarding prevention options. <br/> Participants reported few choices for dealing with chronic stress, and <br/> negatively evaluated dietary changes and increasing exercise. Normative <br/> belief themes revealed a consistent sense that the participants' social <br/> groups would disapprove of the person engaging in preventive lifestyle <br/> strategies, especially changing dietary practices. Data regarding control <br/> beliefs indicated that participants had significant concerns regarding <br/> external factors (e.g., time, social support) with fewer concerns <br/> regarding internal factors (e.g., skill, information). Implications: <br/> Findings will assist nurses to conduct more thorough assessments of <br/> prevention beliefs and social supports of African Americans at risk for <br/> hypertension. Using more group-oriented intervention strategies to <br/> increase social support for preventive behaviors may improve outcomes in <br/> this population.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:39:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:39:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.