2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160137
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Injection Drug Use and Venous Disease: A Compilation of Six Studies
Abstract:
Injection Drug Use and Venous Disease: A Compilation of Six Studies
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Pieper, Barbara, PhD, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:Nursing Department, 5557 Cass Ave, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA
Contact Telephone:313-577-4057
Co-Authors:Thomas Templin, PhD, Associate Professor
Purpose: This presentation will examine themes in six research studies
(1995-2003) about persons who have a history of injection drug use and
chronic venous insufficiency (CVI). Conceptual Framework: The studies were
based on physiologic changes to the legs from destruction of the venous
system from injection drug use. Subjects: The number of participants in
the studies ranged from 32 to 204. The majority were African-American men
and women with mean ages in the 40s. Method: This descriptive review
examined demographic characteristics of participants, pain, severity of
CVI, and ankle joint mobility. Four studies were done in an outpatient
wound clinic; one, in methadone treatment clinics; and one, in a
combination of the two. Results: The drug of choice was injected heroin
(mean years injecting=17). Chronic leg pain was the most common clinical
problem. In prospective studies, worse pain was related to larger wound
area. Pain was a reason given by patients for missing clinic appointments.
Increased severity of CVI was significantly associated with increased
pain. Path analysis showed that leg pain is a mediator of the relationship
between CVI and behavioral functioning controlling for the effects of
other chronic diseases. CVI was evident in 87.7% of persons in methadone
treatment. There was a linear functional relationship between years of
injection drug use and CVI clinical classification, but only when the
injections were in the veins of the groin, legs, and feet. Parameters of
ankle mobility (flexion-extension, inversion-eversion) important for the
calf-muscle pump were significantly related to CVI disease severity.
Conclusions: Persons who have used injected drugs, especially in the
groin, legs and feet, are at high risk for CVI. CVI severity increased leg
pain which negatively impacted ability to function and motion of the ankle
joint.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInjection Drug Use and Venous Disease: A Compilation of Six Studiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160137-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Injection Drug Use and Venous Disease: A Compilation of Six Studies</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pieper, Barbara, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing Department, 5557 Cass Ave, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">313-577-4057</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bapieper@comcast.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Thomas Templin, PhD, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This presentation will examine themes in six research studies <br/> (1995-2003) about persons who have a history of injection drug use and <br/> chronic venous insufficiency (CVI). Conceptual Framework: The studies were <br/> based on physiologic changes to the legs from destruction of the venous <br/> system from injection drug use. Subjects: The number of participants in <br/> the studies ranged from 32 to 204. The majority were African-American men <br/> and women with mean ages in the 40s. Method: This descriptive review <br/> examined demographic characteristics of participants, pain, severity of <br/> CVI, and ankle joint mobility. Four studies were done in an outpatient <br/> wound clinic; one, in methadone treatment clinics; and one, in a <br/> combination of the two. Results: The drug of choice was injected heroin <br/> (mean years injecting=17). Chronic leg pain was the most common clinical <br/> problem. In prospective studies, worse pain was related to larger wound <br/> area. Pain was a reason given by patients for missing clinic appointments. <br/> Increased severity of CVI was significantly associated with increased <br/> pain. Path analysis showed that leg pain is a mediator of the relationship <br/> between CVI and behavioral functioning controlling for the effects of <br/> other chronic diseases. CVI was evident in 87.7% of persons in methadone <br/> treatment. There was a linear functional relationship between years of <br/> injection drug use and CVI clinical classification, but only when the <br/> injections were in the veins of the groin, legs, and feet. Parameters of <br/> ankle mobility (flexion-extension, inversion-eversion) important for the <br/> calf-muscle pump were significantly related to CVI disease severity. <br/> Conclusions: Persons who have used injected drugs, especially in the <br/> groin, legs and feet, are at high risk for CVI. CVI severity increased leg <br/> pain which negatively impacted ability to function and motion of the ankle <br/> joint.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:39:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:39:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.