2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160140
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Seniors' attitudes towards home-based assistive technologies
Abstract:
Seniors' attitudes towards home-based assistive technologies
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Rantz, Marilyn, PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Missouri-Columbia
Title:Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, S406 MU Sinclair School of Nursing, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA
Contact Telephone:(573) 882-0258
Co-Authors:George Demiris, PhD, Assistant Professor; Myra Aud, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor; Marjorie Skubic, PhD, Associate Professor; and Harry W. Tyrer Jr., PhD, Professor
Theoretical background: The aim to meet older adults' desire to remain
independent at home while controlling health care costs has led to the
development of "smart home" or assistive technologies. A smart home is a
residence equipped with technology that enhances safety of patients at
home and monitors their condition. This study was a needs assessment for
the design of such devices and sensors for older adults. This design will
be integrated in Tiger Place, a 34,000 square foot facility developed by
the University of Missouri-Columbia with Americare Systems, Inc., of
Sikeston, Missouri. Emphasis has been placed on design that supports
independence, helping residents to age in place.
Study aim: This study aims to assess seniorsÆ attitudes towards and
perceptions of "smart home" technologies, possible concerns and overall
perceived utility. Furthermore, we aimed to determine the areas of daily
living that seniors identify as appropriate for such interventions.
Methods and Sample: We conducted 3 focus group sessions with 15 older
adults to determine the types of sensors and devices that would constitute
an acceptable smart home design. All participants were over the age of 65
living in a continuing care retirement facility. Each session lasted
approximately one hour. Seven participants were male and eight were
female. The sessions were audio-taped.
Results and Conclusions: The majority of the participants had some
experience with personal computers and portable devices. Areas that were
identified as potential application domains for advanced technologies
included emergency help, prevention and detection of falls, and monitoring
of physiological parameters. Concerns included the level of
user-friendliness of the devices, a potential lack of human response and
the need for training tailored to older learners. The findings indicate
that technology can enhance nursing care if designed to address patients'
needs and expectations rather than to simply follow current technological
developments.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSeniors' attitudes towards home-based assistive technologiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160140-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Seniors' attitudes towards home-based assistive technologies</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rantz, Marilyn, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Missouri-Columbia</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, S406 MU Sinclair School of Nursing, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(573) 882-0258</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">RantzM@missouri.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">George Demiris, PhD, Assistant Professor; Myra Aud, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor; Marjorie Skubic, PhD, Associate Professor; and Harry W. Tyrer Jr., PhD, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Theoretical background: The aim to meet older adults' desire to remain <br/> independent at home while controlling health care costs has led to the <br/> development of &quot;smart home&quot; or assistive technologies. A smart home is a <br/> residence equipped with technology that enhances safety of patients at <br/> home and monitors their condition. This study was a needs assessment for <br/> the design of such devices and sensors for older adults. This design will <br/> be integrated in Tiger Place, a 34,000 square foot facility developed by <br/> the University of Missouri-Columbia with Americare Systems, Inc., of <br/> Sikeston, Missouri. Emphasis has been placed on design that supports <br/> independence, helping residents to age in place. <br/> Study aim: This study aims to assess seniors&AElig; attitudes towards and <br/> perceptions of &quot;smart home&quot; technologies, possible concerns and overall <br/> perceived utility. Furthermore, we aimed to determine the areas of daily <br/> living that seniors identify as appropriate for such interventions.<br/> Methods and Sample: We conducted 3 focus group sessions with 15 older <br/> adults to determine the types of sensors and devices that would constitute <br/> an acceptable smart home design. All participants were over the age of 65 <br/> living in a continuing care retirement facility. Each session lasted <br/> approximately one hour. Seven participants were male and eight were <br/> female. The sessions were audio-taped. <br/> Results and Conclusions: The majority of the participants had some <br/> experience with personal computers and portable devices. Areas that were <br/> identified as potential application domains for advanced technologies <br/> included emergency help, prevention and detection of falls, and monitoring <br/> of physiological parameters. Concerns included the level of <br/> user-friendliness of the devices, a potential lack of human response and <br/> the need for training tailored to older learners. The findings indicate <br/> that technology can enhance nursing care if designed to address patients'<br/> needs and expectations rather than to simply follow current technological <br/> developments.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:39:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:39:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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