A Phenomenological Study of Children and Adolescents with Tourette's Syndrome Regarding Embarrassment: Who Me? Couldn't Be, But Used to Be!

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160142
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Phenomenological Study of Children and Adolescents with Tourette's Syndrome Regarding Embarrassment: Who Me? Couldn't Be, But Used to Be!
Abstract:
A Phenomenological Study of Children and Adolescents with Tourette's Syndrome Regarding Embarrassment: Who Me? Couldn't Be, But Used to Be!
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Rindner, Ellen, PhD, APRN, BC
P.I. Institution Name:University of Kansas Medical Center
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 14028 West 113th Street, Lenexa, KS, 66215, USA
Contact Telephone:913-345-8085
Purposes: Children and adolescents who are diagnosed with Tourette's
Syndrome (TS) can experience uncontrollable motor and vocal tics in front
of others resulting in embarrassment. The research aims were to (1)
describe the experience of embarrassment from the perception of the child
and adolescent with Tourett's, and (2) determine which self-identified
empowerment strategies children and adolescents with TS use to overcome
embarrassment. Theoretical Framework: Husserl's phenomenological method
guided the research. Subjects: Eighteen participants between the ages of
nine and seventeen, who were English-speaking, and racially diverse were
recruited from a Tourette's Center located in a metropolitan area in the
Midwest. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with children
and adolescents after obtaining parental consent and child assent.
Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim and four participants
were consulted for member checks. Streubert's (1991) method guided the
data analysis. Results: Five themes regarding the lived experience of
embarrassment emerged. Embarrassment with TS is: 1) being caught ticcing
2) losing control over your tics in public 3) feeling different than
others, 4) being uneasy about disclosing your tics to others, and 5) an
experience where the intensity of embarrassment with TS decreases over
time. Five themes regarding which self-empowerment strategies emerged.
Becoming self-empowered over embarrassment with TS is to: 1) use
distraction, 2) use of relaxation techniques 3) talk about your feelings
with others, 4) adopt normalizing behaviors, and 5) accept yourself.
Conclusions: The embarrassment that children and adolescents with
Tourette's Syndrome experience is part of the normalization process they
undertake to cope with their disorder. One learns to accommodate to the
embarrassment experienced with TS over time and therefore is able to dull
the intensity of the embarrassment during subsequent embarrassing moments.
Professionals can assist in making the process less painful for the child
or adolescent with Tourette's Syndrome and their families.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Phenomenological Study of Children and Adolescents with Tourette's Syndrome Regarding Embarrassment: Who Me? Couldn't Be, But Used to Be!en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160142-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Phenomenological Study of Children and Adolescents with Tourette's Syndrome Regarding Embarrassment: Who Me? Couldn't Be, But Used to Be!</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rindner, Ellen, PhD, APRN, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Kansas Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 14028 West 113th Street, Lenexa, KS, 66215, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">913-345-8085</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ecrindner@netzero.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purposes: Children and adolescents who are diagnosed with Tourette's <br/> Syndrome (TS) can experience uncontrollable motor and vocal tics in front <br/> of others resulting in embarrassment. The research aims were to (1) <br/> describe the experience of embarrassment from the perception of the child <br/> and adolescent with Tourett's, and (2) determine which self-identified <br/> empowerment strategies children and adolescents with TS use to overcome <br/> embarrassment. Theoretical Framework: Husserl's phenomenological method <br/> guided the research. Subjects: Eighteen participants between the ages of <br/> nine and seventeen, who were English-speaking, and racially diverse were <br/> recruited from a Tourette's Center located in a metropolitan area in the <br/> Midwest. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with children <br/> and adolescents after obtaining parental consent and child assent. <br/> Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim and four participants <br/> were consulted for member checks. Streubert's (1991) method guided the <br/> data analysis. Results: Five themes regarding the lived experience of <br/> embarrassment emerged. Embarrassment with TS is: 1) being caught ticcing <br/> 2) losing control over your tics in public 3) feeling different than <br/> others, 4) being uneasy about disclosing your tics to others, and 5) an <br/> experience where the intensity of embarrassment with TS decreases over <br/> time. Five themes regarding which self-empowerment strategies emerged. <br/> Becoming self-empowered over embarrassment with TS is to: 1) use <br/> distraction, 2) use of relaxation techniques 3) talk about your feelings <br/> with others, 4) adopt normalizing behaviors, and 5) accept yourself. <br/> Conclusions: The embarrassment that children and adolescents with <br/> Tourette's Syndrome experience is part of the normalization process they <br/> undertake to cope with their disorder. One learns to accommodate to the <br/> embarrassment experienced with TS over time and therefore is able to dull <br/> the intensity of the embarrassment during subsequent embarrassing moments. <br/> Professionals can assist in making the process less painful for the child <br/> or adolescent with Tourette's Syndrome and their families.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:39:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:39:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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