2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160143
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Comparative Study of Infant Feeding Intention among Pregnant Adolescents
Abstract:
A Comparative Study of Infant Feeding Intention among Pregnant Adolescents
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Rojjanasrirat, Wilaiporn, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Kansas
Title:Post Doctoral Fellow
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 14905 Locust, Olathe, KS, 66062, USA
Contact Telephone:913-588-0019
Co-Authors:Wejdan Khatar, PhDc, RN and Karen A Wambach, PhD, MS, BSN, Assistant Professor
Objective: To explore the similarities and differences in infant
feeding intentions, knowledge, attitudes, and perceived behavioral control
over breastfeeding among pregnant adolescents based on how they were fed
as infants: breast milk, formula, or unknown feeding.
Design: Descriptive comparative study. The theory of planned behavior
guided this study, which is part of a larger on-going study.
Setting: Recruitment occurred in multiple prenatal clinics in a Midwestern
U.S. city.
Subjects: 113 primagravid adolescents, 15-18 years old, completed the
modified Breastfeeding Prediction Attrition Tool during their second
trimester of pregnancy.
Results: One-way ANOVA indicated teens who were breastfed as infants had
significantly stronger intentions to breastfeed compared to those fed with
formula (F=9.10, P<.05). That group also had significantly higher
breastfeeding perceived behavioral control scores (BFC) compared to the
other groups (F=6.77, P < .05). No significant differences were found in
breastfeeding knowledge or attitude scores.
Implications: The results support other previous research. The higher BFC
and intention scores suggested that teens who were breastfed as infants
felt more in control over breastfeeding behavior and were more committed
to breastfeeding their own infant. The findings also suggested that family
members and role modeling may influence teens' intention to breastfeed.
Health care providers should recognize that breastfeeding intention may be
an important indicator for a breastfeeding decision when counseling teens
during pregnancy. Having family or significant others help teens to feel
positive about breastfeeding may also support a breastfeeding decision. To
reach the Healthy 2010 breastfeeding goals, teens need support from all
health care providers, family, and community.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Comparative Study of Infant Feeding Intention among Pregnant Adolescentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160143-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Comparative Study of Infant Feeding Intention among Pregnant Adolescents</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rojjanasrirat, Wilaiporn, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Kansas</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Post Doctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 14905 Locust, Olathe, KS, 66062, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">913-588-0019</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">wrojjanasrirat@kumc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Wejdan Khatar, PhDc, RN and Karen A Wambach, PhD, MS, BSN, Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To explore the similarities and differences in infant <br/> feeding intentions, knowledge, attitudes, and perceived behavioral control <br/> over breastfeeding among pregnant adolescents based on how they were fed <br/> as infants: breast milk, formula, or unknown feeding.<br/> Design: Descriptive comparative study. The theory of planned behavior <br/> guided this study, which is part of a larger on-going study.<br/> Setting: Recruitment occurred in multiple prenatal clinics in a Midwestern <br/> U.S. city. <br/> Subjects: 113 primagravid adolescents, 15-18 years old, completed the <br/> modified Breastfeeding Prediction Attrition Tool during their second <br/> trimester of pregnancy. <br/> Results: One-way ANOVA indicated teens who were breastfed as infants had <br/> significantly stronger intentions to breastfeed compared to those fed with <br/> formula (F=9.10, P&lt;.05). That group also had significantly higher <br/> breastfeeding perceived behavioral control scores (BFC) compared to the <br/> other groups (F=6.77, P &lt; .05). No significant differences were found in <br/> breastfeeding knowledge or attitude scores. <br/> Implications: The results support other previous research. The higher BFC <br/> and intention scores suggested that teens who were breastfed as infants <br/> felt more in control over breastfeeding behavior and were more committed <br/> to breastfeeding their own infant. The findings also suggested that family <br/> members and role modeling may influence teens' intention to breastfeed. <br/> Health care providers should recognize that breastfeeding intention may be <br/> an important indicator for a breastfeeding decision when counseling teens <br/> during pregnancy. Having family or significant others help teens to feel <br/> positive about breastfeeding may also support a breastfeeding decision. To <br/> reach the Healthy 2010 breastfeeding goals, teens need support from all <br/> health care providers, family, and community.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:39:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:39:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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