A Study Examining the Effects of Active Versus Sedentary Lifestyle on Body IronStores and Oxidative Stress in Pre- and Postmenopausal Women for the Prevention of CVD

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160144
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Study Examining the Effects of Active Versus Sedentary Lifestyle on Body IronStores and Oxidative Stress in Pre- and Postmenopausal Women for the Prevention of CVD
Abstract:
A Study Examining the Effects of Active Versus Sedentary Lifestyle on Body IronStores and Oxidative Stress in Pre- and Postmenopausal Women for the Prevention of CVD
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Rombough, Rosemarie, RN, BscN, MSc
P.I. Institution Name:Queen's University
Title:Administrative Manager
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 92 Barrie Street, Kingston, ON, K7L 4L9, Canada
Contact Telephone:(613) 530-2513
Co-Authors:Ena L. Howse, RN, PhD, Professor; Emma Bartfay, PhD, Assistant Professor; and Wally Bartfay, RN, PhD, Professor
Purpose: The incidence of heart disease is significantly higher in
postmenopausal women as opposed to premenopausal women and may be related
to body iron stores, which may catalyze the production of oxygen free
radicals. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of menstrual
status and exercise on iron stores and oxidative stress in pre- and
postmenopausal women.
Method: Twenty women, ten premenopausal (n=5 active, n=5 sedentary) and ten
postmenopausal women (n=5 active, n=5 sedentary) with no known history of
cardiovascular disease (CVD) were recruited to determine body iron stores
as quantified by serum ferritin and oxidative stress as measured by plasma
MDA levels.
Results: Although active postmenopausal women had lower body iron stores
and oxidative stress they were not found to be significantly different in
comparison to premenopausal active women. Conversely, postmenopausal women
in comparison to premenopausal women had significantly higher levels of
body iron stores and oxidative stress (p<0.01). Furthermore, significantly
lower levels of body iron stores and oxidative stress was found in active
postmenopausal women compared to sedentary postmenopausal women (p<0.01).
Conclusion: These results suggest that exercise may be beneficial in
mobilizing iron stores and decreasing oxidative stress in postmenopausal
women. Further investigations are warranted to examine the mechanism for
these observed effects.
Acknowledgments: Supported by The Anemia Institute For Research & Education
(AIRE), The American Health Assistance Foundation (AHAF), National Heart
Foundation, and the J.P. Bickell Foundation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Study Examining the Effects of Active Versus Sedentary Lifestyle on Body IronStores and Oxidative Stress in Pre- and Postmenopausal Women for the Prevention of CVDen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160144-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Study Examining the Effects of Active Versus Sedentary Lifestyle on Body IronStores and Oxidative Stress in Pre- and Postmenopausal Women for the Prevention of CVD</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rombough, Rosemarie, RN, BscN, MSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Queen's University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Administrative Manager</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 92 Barrie Street, Kingston, ON, K7L 4L9, Canada</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(613) 530-2513</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">amrie@cogeco.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Ena L. Howse, RN, PhD, Professor; Emma Bartfay, PhD, Assistant Professor; and Wally Bartfay, RN, PhD, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The incidence of heart disease is significantly higher in <br/> postmenopausal women as opposed to premenopausal women and may be related <br/> to body iron stores, which may catalyze the production of oxygen free <br/> radicals. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of menstrual <br/> status and exercise on iron stores and oxidative stress in pre- and <br/> postmenopausal women.<br/> Method: Twenty women, ten premenopausal (n=5 active, n=5 sedentary) and ten <br/> postmenopausal women (n=5 active, n=5 sedentary) with no known history of <br/> cardiovascular disease (CVD) were recruited to determine body iron stores <br/> as quantified by serum ferritin and oxidative stress as measured by plasma <br/> MDA levels.<br/> Results: Although active postmenopausal women had lower body iron stores <br/> and oxidative stress they were not found to be significantly different in <br/> comparison to premenopausal active women. Conversely, postmenopausal women <br/> in comparison to premenopausal women had significantly higher levels of <br/> body iron stores and oxidative stress (p&lt;0.01). Furthermore, significantly <br/> lower levels of body iron stores and oxidative stress was found in active <br/> postmenopausal women compared to sedentary postmenopausal women (p&lt;0.01).<br/> Conclusion: These results suggest that exercise may be beneficial in <br/> mobilizing iron stores and decreasing oxidative stress in postmenopausal <br/> women. Further investigations are warranted to examine the mechanism for <br/> these observed effects.<br/> Acknowledgments: Supported by The Anemia Institute For Research &amp; Education <br/> (AIRE), The American Health Assistance Foundation (AHAF), National Heart <br/> Foundation, and the J.P. Bickell Foundation.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:40:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:40:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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