An Analysis of the Correlation Between Reported Exercise Behavior and Measures of Self-Regulation of Exercise in Older Adults

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160146
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Analysis of the Correlation Between Reported Exercise Behavior and Measures of Self-Regulation of Exercise in Older Adults
Abstract:
An Analysis of the Correlation Between Reported Exercise Behavior and Measures of Self-Regulation of Exercise in Older Adults
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Ruppar, Todd, MSN, RN, BC, GCNS
P.I. Institution Name:Washington University
Title:Clinical Nurse Specialist
Contact Address:Department of Neurology, 4488 Forest Park Parkway, Ste. 101, St. Louis, MO, 63108, USA
Contact Telephone:314-286-2407
Co-Authors:Joanne K. Schneider, PhD, RN, GNP, Associate Professor
Despite the research on exercise in the elderly, older adults'
interpretations of exercise and how these interpretations affect exercise
behavior are not well understood. Older adults' prior exercise experiences
influence these interpretations and ultimately affect exercise
maintenance. The self-regulation of exercise maintenance model posits that
episode-specific and general beliefs and perceptions (interpretations)
influence exercise behavior. The purpose of this study was to examine the
differences in interpretations of exercise in older adults based on prior
exercise behavior. Older adults who report more exercise behavior were
hypothesized to score more positively on measures of episode-specific and
general interpretations of exercise than older adults who report less
exercise behavior. Two hundred fifteen older adults (64-88 years, 75.3%
female) reported baseline prior-year exercise behavior through a
standardized questionnaire. After a 2-week exercise training program,
participants completed episode-specific and general interpretations of
exercise instruments. Exercise behavior was dichotomized: high exercisers
above the median, low exercisers below the median. High exercisers
reported higher perceptions of energy (5.96 vs. 5.51, p=.021), life
enhancement (3.12 vs. 3.01, p=.023), and overall psychological outlook
(3.21 vs. 3.03, p=.003) than low exercisers. Supplemental analysis showed
that when controlling for age, high exercisers continued to report greater
life enhancement (p=.021) and psychological outlook (p=.023), while low
exercisers reported more intense sweating during exercise (2.17 vs. 1.91,
p=.022). Women reported clearer thinking (p=.004), more social support
(p=.000), and more concentration on their movements (p=.000) and greater
enjoyment of music (p=.000) during exercise. Men reported feeling greater
pleasure and value from sweating (p=.004) and straining (p=.000), but
found stretching more futile (p=.004). These results support earlier
findings that older adults' beliefs and interpretations of exercise
activity influence behavior. While more investigation is needed, these
findings support interventions that modify interpretations of exercise to
improve older adultsÆ exercise behavior.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Analysis of the Correlation Between Reported Exercise Behavior and Measures of Self-Regulation of Exercise in Older Adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160146-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">An Analysis of the Correlation Between Reported Exercise Behavior and Measures of Self-Regulation of Exercise in Older Adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ruppar, Todd, MSN, RN, BC, GCNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Washington University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Nurse Specialist</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Neurology, 4488 Forest Park Parkway, Ste. 101, St. Louis, MO, 63108, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">314-286-2407</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ruppart@wustl.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Joanne K. Schneider, PhD, RN, GNP, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Despite the research on exercise in the elderly, older adults' <br/> interpretations of exercise and how these interpretations affect exercise <br/> behavior are not well understood. Older adults' prior exercise experiences <br/> influence these interpretations and ultimately affect exercise <br/> maintenance. The self-regulation of exercise maintenance model posits that <br/> episode-specific and general beliefs and perceptions (interpretations) <br/> influence exercise behavior. The purpose of this study was to examine the <br/> differences in interpretations of exercise in older adults based on prior <br/> exercise behavior. Older adults who report more exercise behavior were <br/> hypothesized to score more positively on measures of episode-specific and <br/> general interpretations of exercise than older adults who report less <br/> exercise behavior. Two hundred fifteen older adults (64-88 years, 75.3% <br/> female) reported baseline prior-year exercise behavior through a <br/> standardized questionnaire. After a 2-week exercise training program, <br/> participants completed episode-specific and general interpretations of <br/> exercise instruments. Exercise behavior was dichotomized: high exercisers <br/> above the median, low exercisers below the median. High exercisers <br/> reported higher perceptions of energy (5.96 vs. 5.51, p=.021), life <br/> enhancement (3.12 vs. 3.01, p=.023), and overall psychological outlook <br/> (3.21 vs. 3.03, p=.003) than low exercisers. Supplemental analysis showed <br/> that when controlling for age, high exercisers continued to report greater <br/> life enhancement (p=.021) and psychological outlook (p=.023), while low <br/> exercisers reported more intense sweating during exercise (2.17 vs. 1.91, <br/> p=.022). Women reported clearer thinking (p=.004), more social support <br/> (p=.000), and more concentration on their movements (p=.000) and greater <br/> enjoyment of music (p=.000) during exercise. Men reported feeling greater <br/> pleasure and value from sweating (p=.004) and straining (p=.000), but <br/> found stretching more futile (p=.004). These results support earlier <br/> findings that older adults' beliefs and interpretations of exercise <br/> activity influence behavior. While more investigation is needed, these <br/> findings support interventions that modify interpretations of exercise to <br/> improve older adults&AElig; exercise behavior.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:40:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:40:08Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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