2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160147
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Medication Taking Patterns of Adult Renal Transplant Recipients
Abstract:
Medication Taking Patterns of Adult Renal Transplant Recipients
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Russell, Cynthia, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Missouri-Columbia
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, S423 Sinclair School of Nursing, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA
Contact Telephone:573-884-9541
Co-Authors:Catherine Ashbaugh, MSN, RN, Clinical Nurse Specialist and Vicki Conn, PhD, RN, Professor
Problem: Estimates of medication noncompliance (MNC) among adult renal
transplant (RT) recipients are 25%, despite the alarming potential
consequence of graft rejection, graft loss, and death. Unfortunately
previous research has conceptualized MNC as a unitary construct and no
research has described patterns of MNC that could provide a foundation for
intervention development. Purpose/Design: This prospective, descriptive, longitudinal pilot study
provides preliminary estimates of patterns of MNC.
Theoretical framework: The framework for this study, which is part of a
larger study, is BanduraÆs Social Cognitive Theory.
Subjects: Fifty-five adult RT recipients have been studied.
Method: Highly valid and reliable medication event monitor (MEMS) 5
TrackCAPs collected medication-taking behavior for 6 months. These data
document timing of bottle openings which provides evidence about patterns.
Results: Demographics include: female 27 (49%); male 28 (51%); Caucasian
47 (86%); African American 8 (14%); Etiology of renal disease: polycystic
disease 13 (23%), diabetes 11 (20%), hypertension 11 (20%), focal
glomerular nephritis 7 (14%), other 13 (23%); Type of transplant: deceased
donor 44 (80%); living-related 9 (16%); living-unrelated 2 (4%). Two
immunosuppressive medications were monitored for 180 days per subject.
Patterns for the two monitored immunosuppressive medications are evident
in the data including whether the medications were taken on time, early,
late, or not taken. Distribution of MNC patterns will be presented.
Conclusions/Importance/relevance: This study documents that MNC is a
diverse phenomena. Future research should examine patterns of MNC rather
than providing a number estimate of noncompliance rate, or considering
subjects adherent or non-adherent.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMedication Taking Patterns of Adult Renal Transplant Recipientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160147-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Medication Taking Patterns of Adult Renal Transplant Recipients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Russell, Cynthia, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Missouri-Columbia</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, S423 Sinclair School of Nursing, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">573-884-9541</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">RussellC@health.missouri.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Catherine Ashbaugh, MSN, RN, Clinical Nurse Specialist and Vicki Conn, PhD, RN, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Estimates of medication noncompliance (MNC) among adult renal <br/> transplant (RT) recipients are 25%, despite the alarming potential <br/> consequence of graft rejection, graft loss, and death. Unfortunately <br/> previous research has conceptualized MNC as a unitary construct and no <br/> research has described patterns of MNC that could provide a foundation for <br/> intervention development. Purpose/Design: This prospective, descriptive, longitudinal pilot study <br/> provides preliminary estimates of patterns of MNC. <br/> Theoretical framework: The framework for this study, which is part of a <br/> larger study, is Bandura&AElig;s Social Cognitive Theory. <br/> Subjects: Fifty-five adult RT recipients have been studied.<br/> Method: Highly valid and reliable medication event monitor (MEMS) 5 <br/> TrackCAPs collected medication-taking behavior for 6 months. These data <br/> document timing of bottle openings which provides evidence about patterns. <br/> Results: Demographics include: female 27 (49%); male 28 (51%); Caucasian <br/> 47 (86%); African American 8 (14%); Etiology of renal disease: polycystic <br/> disease 13 (23%), diabetes 11 (20%), hypertension 11 (20%), focal <br/> glomerular nephritis 7 (14%), other 13 (23%); Type of transplant: deceased <br/> donor 44 (80%); living-related 9 (16%); living-unrelated 2 (4%). Two <br/> immunosuppressive medications were monitored for 180 days per subject. <br/> Patterns for the two monitored immunosuppressive medications are evident <br/> in the data including whether the medications were taken on time, early, <br/> late, or not taken. Distribution of MNC patterns will be presented. <br/> Conclusions/Importance/relevance: This study documents that MNC is a <br/> diverse phenomena. Future research should examine patterns of MNC rather <br/> than providing a number estimate of noncompliance rate, or considering <br/> subjects adherent or non-adherent.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:40:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:40:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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