Smoking Status in Early Pregnancy: What is the Role of Self-Efficacy, Depression, and Perceived Stress

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160149
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Smoking Status in Early Pregnancy: What is the Role of Self-Efficacy, Depression, and Perceived Stress
Abstract:
Smoking Status in Early Pregnancy: What is the Role of Self-Efficacy, Depression, and Perceived Stress
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Scheibmeir, Monica, PhD, FNP
P.I. Institution Name:University of Kansas
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 3901 Rainbow Boulevard, Kansas City, KS, 66160, USA
Contact Telephone:9135881664
Co-Authors:Sandra Hall, PhD, Assistant Professor; Kimberly Johnston, MSN, BSN, Nurse Practitioner; and Johanna Frankel-Comes, MSN, BSN, Family Nurse Practitioner
Purpose: Overall prevalence of smoking in pregnancy has declined to 11.8% but is reported
as high as 40% among women receiving Medicaid benefits. Women who are the
least equipped to handle health problems associated with maternal smoking
are the least likely to quit smoking. The purpose of this study was to
describe the relationship between factors associated with confidence in
not smoking and smoking status among low-income pregnant women in early
pregnancy. Theoretical Framework: Smoking cessation self-efficacy is an
individual's perception of his/her ability to refrain from smoking in
selected situations. Identifying significant factors associated with
enhancing a pregnant woman's perception of her ability to quit smoking is
desirable. Subjects: Pregnant women who reported that they smoked prior to
pregnancy and were less than 20 weeks gestation were recruited for the
study. Participant recruitment took place at two clinics that provide
prenatal services to low-income women. One-hundred and twenty-five women
agreed to participate in the study. The majority of women were Caucasian,
single, and had not completed high school. The mean age of the sample was
23.5 years. Methods: Participants were asked to complete a written survey
prior to the 20th week of pregnancy. Women who reported as ex-smokers
submitted a urine specimen for cotinine testing. Results: Logistic
regression analysis revealed that lower scores for smoking cessation
self-efficacy were predictive of being a continuous smoker in early
pregnancy. Analysis of variance revealed that depression (CES-D 10) did
not explain self-efficacy, but perceived stress did F (2,71)=7.15, p=.001,
accounting for 17% of the variance. Conclusions: Women who are having
difficulty with managing day-to-day hassles are less likely to feel
confident in their ability to attempt smoking cessation during pregnancy.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSmoking Status in Early Pregnancy: What is the Role of Self-Efficacy, Depression, and Perceived Stressen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160149-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Smoking Status in Early Pregnancy: What is the Role of Self-Efficacy, Depression, and Perceived Stress</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Scheibmeir, Monica, PhD, FNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Kansas</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 3901 Rainbow Boulevard, Kansas City, KS, 66160, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">9135881664</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mscheibm@kumc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Sandra Hall, PhD, Assistant Professor; Kimberly Johnston, MSN, BSN, Nurse Practitioner; and Johanna Frankel-Comes, MSN, BSN, Family Nurse Practitioner</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Overall prevalence of smoking in pregnancy has declined to 11.8% but is reported <br/> as high as 40% among women receiving Medicaid benefits. Women who are the <br/> least equipped to handle health problems associated with maternal smoking <br/> are the least likely to quit smoking. The purpose of this study was to <br/> describe the relationship between factors associated with confidence in <br/> not smoking and smoking status among low-income pregnant women in early <br/> pregnancy. Theoretical Framework: Smoking cessation self-efficacy is an <br/> individual's perception of his/her ability to refrain from smoking in <br/> selected situations. Identifying significant factors associated with <br/> enhancing a pregnant woman's perception of her ability to quit smoking is <br/> desirable. Subjects: Pregnant women who reported that they smoked prior to <br/> pregnancy and were less than 20 weeks gestation were recruited for the <br/> study. Participant recruitment took place at two clinics that provide <br/> prenatal services to low-income women. One-hundred and twenty-five women <br/> agreed to participate in the study. The majority of women were Caucasian, <br/> single, and had not completed high school. The mean age of the sample was <br/> 23.5 years. Methods: Participants were asked to complete a written survey <br/> prior to the 20th week of pregnancy. Women who reported as ex-smokers <br/> submitted a urine specimen for cotinine testing. Results: Logistic <br/> regression analysis revealed that lower scores for smoking cessation <br/> self-efficacy were predictive of being a continuous smoker in early <br/> pregnancy. Analysis of variance revealed that depression (CES-D 10) did <br/> not explain self-efficacy, but perceived stress did F (2,71)=7.15, p=.001, <br/> accounting for 17% of the variance. Conclusions: Women who are having <br/> difficulty with managing day-to-day hassles are less likely to feel <br/> confident in their ability to attempt smoking cessation during pregnancy.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:40:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:40:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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