2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160150
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Children's Perceptions of Nurse Behaviors: Replication of a Qualitative Study
Abstract:
Children's Perceptions of Nurse Behaviors: Replication of a Qualitative Study
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Schmidt, Cynthia, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Southern Illinois University Edwardsville
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Box 1066, Edwardsville, IL, 62026, USA
Contact Telephone:618-650-3921
Co-Authors:Jessica Weese, BSN, RN, Clinical Manager; Laura W Bernaix, PhD, RN, Associate Professor; Annette Williams, BSN, RN, Casey O'Brien, BSN, RN; Melissa Judge, BSN, RN; and Sharon Roberts, BSN, RN
Pediatric nurses are taught to interact with hospitalized children
based upon the work of major developmental theorists and studies of
childrenÆs responses to illness and interventions. There is limited
research, however, on childrenÆs perceptions of hospitalization and of
nurse behaviors based upon the words of children. The aim of this
qualitative replication study was to further describe children's
perceptions of nurses and identify nurse behaviors that best helped these
children cope with hospitalization. This study sample allowed comparison
among children with varying diagnoses and who were Spanish-speaking.
Peplau's theory of Psychodynamic Nursing guided this study. A survey was
used to elicit children's thoughts and feelings about their experiences
with nurses while hospitalized at a major childrenÆs hospital in a large
city in the Midwest. The survey questions were written based upon the
literature and revised following the review of experts; one question was
added following the original study. The survey was read to younger
children; older children responded to a written self-report version of the
survey. Using qualitative descriptive analysis, themes were identified and
similarities and differences among and between demographic groups were
generated. All of the children in this study reported positive feelings
about nurses. Themes identified were consistent with those from the first
study. Children perceived nurses to be kind and caring and appreciated the
following: interactions which acknowledged the child as an individual,
provision of physical comfort and basic physical needs, age-appropriate
entertainment/diversion, behaviors perceived as protective, reassuring
words, and caring attitudes. As the children aged, they were more likely
to identify the importance of verbal interaction with the nurse as helpful
during hospitalization. The most frequently identified negative behavior
was infliction of pain. This type of qualitative data will generate
understanding of the childÆs perspectives and provide the insight to
facilitate effective and therapeutic interactions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleChildren's Perceptions of Nurse Behaviors: Replication of a Qualitative Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160150-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Children's Perceptions of Nurse Behaviors: Replication of a Qualitative Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Schmidt, Cynthia, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Southern Illinois University Edwardsville</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Box 1066, Edwardsville, IL, 62026, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">618-650-3921</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">caschmi@siue.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jessica Weese, BSN, RN, Clinical Manager; Laura W Bernaix, PhD, RN, Associate Professor; Annette Williams, BSN, RN, Casey O'Brien, BSN, RN; Melissa Judge, BSN, RN; and Sharon Roberts, BSN, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Pediatric nurses are taught to interact with hospitalized children <br/> based upon the work of major developmental theorists and studies of <br/> children&AElig;s responses to illness and interventions. There is limited <br/> research, however, on children&AElig;s perceptions of hospitalization and of <br/> nurse behaviors based upon the words of children. The aim of this <br/> qualitative replication study was to further describe children's <br/> perceptions of nurses and identify nurse behaviors that best helped these <br/> children cope with hospitalization. This study sample allowed comparison <br/> among children with varying diagnoses and who were Spanish-speaking. <br/> Peplau's theory of Psychodynamic Nursing guided this study. A survey was <br/> used to elicit children's thoughts and feelings about their experiences <br/> with nurses while hospitalized at a major children&AElig;s hospital in a large <br/> city in the Midwest. The survey questions were written based upon the <br/> literature and revised following the review of experts; one question was <br/> added following the original study. The survey was read to younger <br/> children; older children responded to a written self-report version of the <br/> survey. Using qualitative descriptive analysis, themes were identified and <br/> similarities and differences among and between demographic groups were <br/> generated. All of the children in this study reported positive feelings <br/> about nurses. Themes identified were consistent with those from the first <br/> study. Children perceived nurses to be kind and caring and appreciated the <br/> following: interactions which acknowledged the child as an individual, <br/> provision of physical comfort and basic physical needs, age-appropriate <br/> entertainment/diversion, behaviors perceived as protective, reassuring <br/> words, and caring attitudes. As the children aged, they were more likely <br/> to identify the importance of verbal interaction with the nurse as helpful <br/> during hospitalization. The most frequently identified negative behavior <br/> was infliction of pain. This type of qualitative data will generate <br/> understanding of the child&AElig;s perspectives and provide the insight to <br/> facilitate effective and therapeutic interactions.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:40:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:40:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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