2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160153
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Mitral Valve Prolapse Syndrome: Self-Care Strategies for Symptom Management
Abstract:
Mitral Valve Prolapse Syndrome: Self-Care Strategies for Symptom Management
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Scordo, Kristine, PhD, ACNP, ANP
P.I. Institution Name:Wright State University
Title:Graduate Program Director
Contact Address:Nursing Department, Colonel Glen Highway, Dayton, OH, 45435, USA
Contact Telephone:937-775-2628
Co-Authors:Director
Background: The annoying and frightening symptoms associated with
mitral valve prolapse syndrome (MVPS) interfere with social functioning
and cause patients to seek help in emergency rooms, urgent care centers,
and primary care offices. Objective: To describe common MVPS symptoms and
self-care treatments reported by individuals. The conceptual framework
that guided the study was built on the work of Lenz and colleagues who
proposed a theory of unpleasant symptoms. Method: A descriptive
cross-sectional design involving patients aged 21 and over diagnosed with
MVPS. The sample of 837 persons completed a MVPS symptom checklist and
survey, MUIS, SF-36, STAI, MOS Social Support, and Food Frequency
Questionnaire. Descriptive statistics used to address the study questions
Results: Over 50% of the respondents reported palpitations, anxiety,
skipped heartbeat, fatigue, lightheadedness, panic attacks, shortness of
breath, and dizziness. Self-care interventions to improve symptoms
included adequate rest, avoiding stress and caffeine, regular exercise and
increased water intake. Alternative therapies included yoga, meditation,
music and relaxation. Conclusions: Information obtained assists in
developing data on symptoms of MVPS and self-imposed interventions. These
data are necessary to develop and modifying existing education and self
management interventions aimed at reducing anxiety and improving the
health and well being of the millions of Americans newly diagnosed with
this syndrome annually.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMitral Valve Prolapse Syndrome: Self-Care Strategies for Symptom Managementen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160153-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Mitral Valve Prolapse Syndrome: Self-Care Strategies for Symptom Management</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Scordo, Kristine, PhD, ACNP, ANP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wright State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Graduate Program Director</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing Department, Colonel Glen Highway, Dayton, OH, 45435, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">937-775-2628</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kscordo@cinci.rr.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Director</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: The annoying and frightening symptoms associated with <br/> mitral valve prolapse syndrome (MVPS) interfere with social functioning <br/> and cause patients to seek help in emergency rooms, urgent care centers, <br/> and primary care offices. Objective: To describe common MVPS symptoms and <br/> self-care treatments reported by individuals. The conceptual framework <br/> that guided the study was built on the work of Lenz and colleagues who <br/> proposed a theory of unpleasant symptoms. Method: A descriptive <br/> cross-sectional design involving patients aged 21 and over diagnosed with <br/> MVPS. The sample of 837 persons completed a MVPS symptom checklist and <br/> survey, MUIS, SF-36, STAI, MOS Social Support, and Food Frequency <br/> Questionnaire. Descriptive statistics used to address the study questions <br/> Results: Over 50% of the respondents reported palpitations, anxiety, <br/> skipped heartbeat, fatigue, lightheadedness, panic attacks, shortness of <br/> breath, and dizziness. Self-care interventions to improve symptoms <br/> included adequate rest, avoiding stress and caffeine, regular exercise and <br/> increased water intake. Alternative therapies included yoga, meditation, <br/> music and relaxation. Conclusions: Information obtained assists in <br/> developing data on symptoms of MVPS and self-imposed interventions. These <br/> data are necessary to develop and modifying existing education and self <br/> management interventions aimed at reducing anxiety and improving the <br/> health and well being of the millions of Americans newly diagnosed with <br/> this syndrome annually.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:40:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:40:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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