2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160154
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Is the story writing and story time an effective teaching method?
Abstract:
Is the story writing and story time an effective teaching method?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Shieh, Carol, DNS, RN, C
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Environments for Health, 1111 Middle Drive, Indianapolis, IN, 46202-5107, USA
Contact Telephone:317-278-1575
This study examined the effectiveness of using the story writing and
story time method in clinical teaching.
Mezerow's Transformative Learning Theory, Feminist Pedagogy, and Ricoeur's
writing on narratives guided the development of this teaching method.
Story writing and story time encourage students to relate theoretical
disease concepts to patient reality and to engage in discussion and
dialogue that help develop diverse patient interventions.
This study included two phases of evaluation. In both phases, each student
during a 7-week clinical wrote a story of an obstetric or a pediatric
health problem. Each story included main characters, physical and
psychosocial alterations, interdisciplinary interventions, and selected
nursing focuses on patient teaching, ethics, and culture. Each story was
read aloud by its writer and analyzed by the group in story time during
the post clinical conference. The faculty facilitated story analysis and
helped students develop alternative interventions.
Phase I evaluation included 17 ASN and 9 BSN students. Their written
comments on story experiences were analyzed for common themes.
In Phase II, 16 ASN students scored a 5-item questionnaire before and
after the story experience. This questionnaire assessed knowledge
acquisition in physical alterations, psychosocial alterations,
interventions, legal/ethical/cultural issues, and community resources. The
questionnaire had a 5-point Likert format with 1 being strongly agree and
5 being strongly disagree. Paired t tests were used to compare pre and
post test mean scores.
Common themes describing the story writing and story time experiences
included bringing learning to a personal level, a way of knowing, clinical
thinking, and more in-depth learning. Pre and post test mean scores were
significantly different, indicating students increased understanding in
five knowledge areas after the story experience (p < .05).
Findings suggested that the story writing and story time is an effective
way of teaching. Future research, however, should include comparison
groups.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIs the story writing and story time an effective teaching method?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160154-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Is the story writing and story time an effective teaching method?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Shieh, Carol, DNS, RN, C</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Environments for Health, 1111 Middle Drive, Indianapolis, IN, 46202-5107, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">317-278-1575</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">wshieh@iupui.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This study examined the effectiveness of using the story writing and <br/> story time method in clinical teaching.<br/> Mezerow's Transformative Learning Theory, Feminist Pedagogy, and Ricoeur's <br/> writing on narratives guided the development of this teaching method. <br/> Story writing and story time encourage students to relate theoretical <br/> disease concepts to patient reality and to engage in discussion and <br/> dialogue that help develop diverse patient interventions.<br/> This study included two phases of evaluation. In both phases, each student <br/> during a 7-week clinical wrote a story of an obstetric or a pediatric <br/> health problem. Each story included main characters, physical and <br/> psychosocial alterations, interdisciplinary interventions, and selected <br/> nursing focuses on patient teaching, ethics, and culture. Each story was <br/> read aloud by its writer and analyzed by the group in story time during <br/> the post clinical conference. The faculty facilitated story analysis and <br/> helped students develop alternative interventions. <br/> Phase I evaluation included 17 ASN and 9 BSN students. Their written <br/> comments on story experiences were analyzed for common themes.<br/> In Phase II, 16 ASN students scored a 5-item questionnaire before and <br/> after the story experience. This questionnaire assessed knowledge <br/> acquisition in physical alterations, psychosocial alterations, <br/> interventions, legal/ethical/cultural issues, and community resources. The <br/> questionnaire had a 5-point Likert format with 1 being strongly agree and <br/> 5 being strongly disagree. Paired t tests were used to compare pre and <br/> post test mean scores.<br/> Common themes describing the story writing and story time experiences <br/> included bringing learning to a personal level, a way of knowing, clinical <br/> thinking, and more in-depth learning. Pre and post test mean scores were <br/> significantly different, indicating students increased understanding in <br/> five knowledge areas after the story experience (p &lt; .05). <br/> Findings suggested that the story writing and story time is an effective <br/> way of teaching. Future research, however, should include comparison <br/> groups.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:40:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:40:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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