Efficacy of Common Intrauterine Resuscitation Techniques in Improving Fetal Oxygen Status during Labor

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160157
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Efficacy of Common Intrauterine Resuscitation Techniques in Improving Fetal Oxygen Status during Labor
Abstract:
Efficacy of Common Intrauterine Resuscitation Techniques in Improving Fetal Oxygen Status during Labor
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Simpson, Kathleen, PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:St. John's Mercy Medical Center
Title:Clinical Nurse Specialist
Contact Address:Labor and Delivery, 7140 Pershing Ave, St. Louis, MO, 63130, USA
Contact Telephone:314-569-6087
Co-Authors:Dotti C. James, PhD, RN, Associate Professor
Problem: Intravenous fluid boluses, lateral positioning and oxygen
administration are common techniques used by nurses during labor when the
fetal heart rate pattern suggests fetal compromise. Little data exists
concerning their efficacy in improving fetal oxygen status. Purpose: To
evaluate the efficacy of these techniques in improving fetal oxygen status
as measured by fetal oxygen saturation (FSpO2). A physiologic framework
was used to guide the study. Methods: This prospective study evaluated
three intrauterine resuscitation techniques in 56 healthy women during
labor. Women were first randomized to a 500 mL or 1000 mL intravenous
fluid bolus, and then one of six position sequences that included L
lateral, R lateral and supine with the head of the bed elevated 30o.
Finally, each received oxygen at 10 L/min via nonrebreather facemask for
15 minutes. Differences in FSpO2 were evaluated before, during, and after
each intervention. Results: Both intravenous bolus amounts increased FSpO2
(500 mL: M=3.71, p=.03; 1000 mL: M=5.15, p=.001), however the effect was
greater and longer lasting for the 1000 mL group (p=.003). FSpO2 was
higher in a lateral position (Left M=48.28, Right M=47.68) than a supine
position (M=Supine 37.48, p < .001). Oxygen at 10 L/min increased FSpO2
(M=8.73, p=.001).The effect persisted for >30 minutes after the oxygen was
discontinued (p=.001). For fetuses with FSpO2 <40% before maternal oxygen
administration, the increase was greater (M=11.38) and longer lasting as
compared to those with FSpO2 >40% (M=7.56, p < .001). Conclusions:
Intravenous fluid boluses, lateral positioning and oxygen administration
at 10 L/min via nonrebreather facemask each are effective nursing
interventions to increase FSpO2 during labor. Supported by a Grant from
AWHONN sponsored by Philips Medical Systems.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEfficacy of Common Intrauterine Resuscitation Techniques in Improving Fetal Oxygen Status during Laboren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160157-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Efficacy of Common Intrauterine Resuscitation Techniques in Improving Fetal Oxygen Status during Labor</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Simpson, Kathleen, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">St. John's Mercy Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Nurse Specialist</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Labor and Delivery, 7140 Pershing Ave, St. Louis, MO, 63130, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">314-569-6087</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">KRSimpson@prodigy.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Dotti C. James, PhD, RN, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Intravenous fluid boluses, lateral positioning and oxygen <br/> administration are common techniques used by nurses during labor when the <br/> fetal heart rate pattern suggests fetal compromise. Little data exists <br/> concerning their efficacy in improving fetal oxygen status. Purpose: To <br/> evaluate the efficacy of these techniques in improving fetal oxygen status <br/> as measured by fetal oxygen saturation (FSpO2). A physiologic framework <br/> was used to guide the study. Methods: This prospective study evaluated <br/> three intrauterine resuscitation techniques in 56 healthy women during <br/> labor. Women were first randomized to a 500 mL or 1000 mL intravenous <br/> fluid bolus, and then one of six position sequences that included L <br/> lateral, R lateral and supine with the head of the bed elevated 30o. <br/> Finally, each received oxygen at 10 L/min via nonrebreather facemask for <br/> 15 minutes. Differences in FSpO2 were evaluated before, during, and after <br/> each intervention. Results: Both intravenous bolus amounts increased FSpO2 <br/> (500 mL: M=3.71, p=.03; 1000 mL: M=5.15, p=.001), however the effect was <br/> greater and longer lasting for the 1000 mL group (p=.003). FSpO2 was <br/> higher in a lateral position (Left M=48.28, Right M=47.68) than a supine <br/> position (M=Supine 37.48, p &lt; .001). Oxygen at 10 L/min increased FSpO2 <br/> (M=8.73, p=.001).The effect persisted for &gt;30 minutes after the oxygen was <br/> discontinued (p=.001). For fetuses with FSpO2 &lt;40% before maternal oxygen <br/> administration, the increase was greater (M=11.38) and longer lasting as <br/> compared to those with FSpO2 &gt;40% (M=7.56, p &lt; .001). Conclusions: <br/> Intravenous fluid boluses, lateral positioning and oxygen administration <br/> at 10 L/min via nonrebreather facemask each are effective nursing <br/> interventions to increase FSpO2 during labor. Supported by a Grant from <br/> AWHONN sponsored by Philips Medical Systems.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:40:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:40:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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