2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160158
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Multi-disciplinary Primary Health Care Practice
Abstract:
Multi-disciplinary Primary Health Care Practice
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Solheim, Karen, PhD, APRN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Post Doctoral Fellow
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 845 S. Damen Avenue, Chicago, IL, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:3124137476
Co-Authors:Beverly J. McElmurry, EdD, RN, FAAN, Associate Dean and Mi Ja Kim, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor
Primary Health Care (PHC) is a systems perspective for examining the
provision of essential health care for all. A multi-disciplinary (MD)
collaborative approach to health care delivery is associated with
effective health care delivery and care providers' enrichment. Yet data
regarding MD practice within PHC are limited. The purpose of this study
was to better understand multi-disciplinary PHC practice. Aims included:
1) describing nursing faculty involvement in PHC; 2) analyzing ways that
multi-disciplinary work was enacted; and, 3) recommending strategies for
MD PHC practice. With IRB approval, data collection for this qualitative
descriptive design occurred by: 1) surveying faculty/staff in a
Mid-western nursing college (N=94) about their PHC practice; 2)
interviewing a purposive sample of nursing faculty/staff identified with
PHC (N=10); and, 3) interviewing collaborating health professionals (N=8).
Survey results (30% return rate) were summarized; interview notes were
transcribed, and a systematic process of content analysis applied. Study
findings identify MD team practice as highly valued because health care
issues are complex, requiring different types of expertise; and because
team fosters comprehensive, safe care and improved resource use. Shared
vision, respect, relationship building and strong leadership facilitate
teamwork. Though not a common term, nurses and their collaborators readily
associated their practice with PHC ethos. PHC practice requires
understanding community complexity and engaging community, family and
individual viewpoints. Though supports exist for PHC in the US,
participants identified discord between their view of population needs and
the health care system. The following interpretations arise from this
study: PHC does not explicitly frame health care activity in the US,
though some practitioners are committed to its ethics; and, teamwork
within PHC is associated with better health care and rewarding
professional experience. Strategies to develop MD teams have been
identified and knowledge of MD team practice can be applied to nurses'
practice settings.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMulti-disciplinary Primary Health Care Practiceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160158-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Multi-disciplinary Primary Health Care Practice</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Solheim, Karen, PhD, APRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Post Doctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 845 S. Damen Avenue, Chicago, IL, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">3124137476</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ksolheim@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Beverly J. McElmurry, EdD, RN, FAAN, Associate Dean and Mi Ja Kim, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Primary Health Care (PHC) is a systems perspective for examining the <br/> provision of essential health care for all. A multi-disciplinary (MD) <br/> collaborative approach to health care delivery is associated with <br/> effective health care delivery and care providers' enrichment. Yet data <br/> regarding MD practice within PHC are limited. The purpose of this study <br/> was to better understand multi-disciplinary PHC practice. Aims included: <br/> 1) describing nursing faculty involvement in PHC; 2) analyzing ways that <br/> multi-disciplinary work was enacted; and, 3) recommending strategies for <br/> MD PHC practice. With IRB approval, data collection for this qualitative <br/> descriptive design occurred by: 1) surveying faculty/staff in a <br/> Mid-western nursing college (N=94) about their PHC practice; 2) <br/> interviewing a purposive sample of nursing faculty/staff identified with <br/> PHC (N=10); and, 3) interviewing collaborating health professionals (N=8). <br/> Survey results (30% return rate) were summarized; interview notes were <br/> transcribed, and a systematic process of content analysis applied. Study <br/> findings identify MD team practice as highly valued because health care <br/> issues are complex, requiring different types of expertise; and because <br/> team fosters comprehensive, safe care and improved resource use. Shared <br/> vision, respect, relationship building and strong leadership facilitate <br/> teamwork. Though not a common term, nurses and their collaborators readily <br/> associated their practice with PHC ethos. PHC practice requires <br/> understanding community complexity and engaging community, family and <br/> individual viewpoints. Though supports exist for PHC in the US, <br/> participants identified discord between their view of population needs and <br/> the health care system. The following interpretations arise from this <br/> study: PHC does not explicitly frame health care activity in the US, <br/> though some practitioners are committed to its ethics; and, teamwork <br/> within PHC is associated with better health care and rewarding <br/> professional experience. Strategies to develop MD teams have been <br/> identified and knowledge of MD team practice can be applied to nurses' <br/> practice settings.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:40:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:40:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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