Sources of Discrepancies Between Interview Responses and Observations in Reports of Mealtime Behaviors

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160161
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Sources of Discrepancies Between Interview Responses and Observations in Reports of Mealtime Behaviors
Abstract:
Sources of Discrepancies Between Interview Responses and Observations in Reports of Mealtime Behaviors
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Stommel, Manfred, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Michigan State University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 222 West Fee Hall, East Lansing, MI, 48824, USA
Contact Telephone:517-355-5123
Co-Authors:Strunk Judith, PhDc, MSN, Mildred A Horodynski, PhD, MN, BSN, WHNPC, Professor
It is well known in the survey literature that emotions can color
survey participants' responses. Respondents' emotions play a pivotal role
in how they perceive and remember behaviors and activities around them.
Thus, self-report measures may provide 'biased' representations of reality
in areas generally considered to be socially and emotionally sensitive.
Using data from a cross-sectional survey and parallel, but independent,
observations recorded by study personnel of the Nutrition Education Aimed
at Toddlers (NEAT) intervention study, we examine the degree of
discrepancy between these two sources of information. The convenience
sample for this pilot study consists of 121 Early Head Start families in
28 counties of Michigan. Survey respondents were caregivers of toddlers
averaging 28 years of age (range: 17-54), many of whom did not work (47%),
were not married (63%), were white (83%), had only high school education
or less (57%), tended to be overweight (25%) or obese (34%) and suffered
from depressive symptomatology (CESD score of 16+: 38%). Discrepancies
between caregiver interview responses and observations were divided into
two categories: 'overestimates', if the caregiver reported that a
particular activity occurred more frequently than observed by study
personnel, and 'underestimates', if the caregiver reported a less frequent
occurrence of an activity. For example, a caregiver might underestimate TV
use, claiming it is "never" on, while the observations indicate it is
"often" on. Twenty-two out of thirty-two activities revealed statistically
significant discrepancies the self-report ratings and those of the
observers. Depressed caregivers in particular were more likely to
systematically underestimate signs of independence among their toddlers.
Implications for mealtime behavior studies in particular and self-report
measures in general will be discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSources of Discrepancies Between Interview Responses and Observations in Reports of Mealtime Behaviorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160161-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Sources of Discrepancies Between Interview Responses and Observations in Reports of Mealtime Behaviors</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Stommel, Manfred, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Michigan State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 222 West Fee Hall, East Lansing, MI, 48824, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">517-355-5123</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">stommel@msu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Strunk Judith, PhDc, MSN, Mildred A Horodynski, PhD, MN, BSN, WHNPC, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">It is well known in the survey literature that emotions can color <br/> survey participants' responses. Respondents' emotions play a pivotal role <br/> in how they perceive and remember behaviors and activities around them. <br/> Thus, self-report measures may provide 'biased' representations of reality <br/> in areas generally considered to be socially and emotionally sensitive. <br/> Using data from a cross-sectional survey and parallel, but independent, <br/> observations recorded by study personnel of the Nutrition Education Aimed <br/> at Toddlers (NEAT) intervention study, we examine the degree of <br/> discrepancy between these two sources of information. The convenience <br/> sample for this pilot study consists of 121 Early Head Start families in <br/> 28 counties of Michigan. Survey respondents were caregivers of toddlers <br/> averaging 28 years of age (range: 17-54), many of whom did not work (47%), <br/> were not married (63%), were white (83%), had only high school education <br/> or less (57%), tended to be overweight (25%) or obese (34%) and suffered <br/> from depressive symptomatology (CESD score of 16+: 38%). Discrepancies <br/> between caregiver interview responses and observations were divided into <br/> two categories: 'overestimates', if the caregiver reported that a <br/> particular activity occurred more frequently than observed by study <br/> personnel, and 'underestimates', if the caregiver reported a less frequent <br/> occurrence of an activity. For example, a caregiver might underestimate TV <br/> use, claiming it is &quot;never&quot; on, while the observations indicate it is <br/> &quot;often&quot; on. Twenty-two out of thirty-two activities revealed statistically <br/> significant discrepancies the self-report ratings and those of the <br/> observers. Depressed caregivers in particular were more likely to <br/> systematically underestimate signs of independence among their toddlers. <br/> Implications for mealtime behavior studies in particular and self-report <br/> measures in general will be discussed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:40:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:40:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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