Attitudes Toward Computers and Satisfaction Using the Caring~Web¬ Intervention by Older Adult Home Caregivers of Stroke Survivors

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160163
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Attitudes Toward Computers and Satisfaction Using the Caring~Web¬ Intervention by Older Adult Home Caregivers of Stroke Survivors
Abstract:
Attitudes Toward Computers and Satisfaction Using the Caring~Web¬ Intervention by Older Adult Home Caregivers of Stroke Survivors
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Tavormina, Candace
P.I. Institution Name:Eastern Michigan University
Contact Address:College of Nursing, Marshall Hall, Ypsilanti, MI, 48197, USA
Contact Telephone:419-251-8931
The National Stroke Association claims four out of every five American families will be touched by stroke resulting in a cost of $30 billion annually for treatment of functional disability. No studies have focused on older adult caregivers of persons with stroke and satisfaction using the Internet for education and support. The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a relationship between attitudes toward computer use by older adult caregivers of persons with stroke and satisfaction with use of the Caring~Web intervention. The investigator in collaboration with an on-going study used the Caring~Web Internet site which offered: Ask the Nurse, opportunity to ask questions of the nurse/rehabilitation team; Caretalk, e-mail discussion with other caregivers and nurse specialist; Educational Information, selected Internet links about stroke and care giving; and Tip of the Month, customized educational stroke information. Caring~Web advocated the supportive-educative component of Orem's theory of nursing systems which allowed technology to enable nursing agency. Predictive correlational design was used to examine the relationship between attitude toward computer use at baseline and satisfaction using Caring~Web after two months. Twenty caregivers 55 years and older of first stroke survivors discharged to home were recruited from rehabilitation centers in northwestern Ohio. They were given access to Caring~Web for two months by MSN/WebTV or computer, and data were collected by pre and post-intervention questionnaires. The participants reported their attitudes most positively in the dimension of control and least in dehumanization. No correlation (r=.17, p=.47) was detected between attitudes toward computers at baseline and satisfaction using Caring~Web after two months. However, nursing practice and research implications suggest creative use of informatics as an economical method of providing reliable and accessible healthcare information and support for informal caregivers of persons with chronic disease such as stroke. (Poster Presentation)
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAttitudes Toward Computers and Satisfaction Using the Caring~Web¬ Intervention by Older Adult Home Caregivers of Stroke Survivorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160163-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Attitudes Toward Computers and Satisfaction Using the Caring~Web&not; Intervention by Older Adult Home Caregivers of Stroke Survivors</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tavormina, Candace</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Eastern Michigan University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, Marshall Hall, Ypsilanti, MI, 48197, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">419-251-8931</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">candace.tavormina@mercycollege.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The National Stroke Association claims four out of every five American families will be touched by stroke resulting in a cost of $30 billion annually for treatment of functional disability. No studies have focused on older adult caregivers of persons with stroke and satisfaction using the Internet for education and support. The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a relationship between attitudes toward computer use by older adult caregivers of persons with stroke and satisfaction with use of the Caring~Web intervention. The investigator in collaboration with an on-going study used the Caring~Web Internet site which offered: Ask the Nurse, opportunity to ask questions of the nurse/rehabilitation team; Caretalk, e-mail discussion with other caregivers and nurse specialist; Educational Information, selected Internet links about stroke and care giving; and Tip of the Month, customized educational stroke information. Caring~Web advocated the supportive-educative component of Orem's theory of nursing systems which allowed technology to enable nursing agency. Predictive correlational design was used to examine the relationship between attitude toward computer use at baseline and satisfaction using Caring~Web after two months. Twenty caregivers 55 years and older of first stroke survivors discharged to home were recruited from rehabilitation centers in northwestern Ohio. They were given access to Caring~Web for two months by MSN/WebTV or computer, and data were collected by pre and post-intervention questionnaires. The participants reported their attitudes most positively in the dimension of control and least in dehumanization. No correlation (r=.17, p=.47) was detected between attitudes toward computers at baseline and satisfaction using Caring~Web after two months. However, nursing practice and research implications suggest creative use of informatics as an economical method of providing reliable and accessible healthcare information and support for informal caregivers of persons with chronic disease such as stroke. (Poster Presentation)</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:41:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:41:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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