2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160168
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Is the Value of Autonomy Reflected in Home Healthcare Practice Models?
Abstract:
Is the Value of Autonomy Reflected in Home Healthcare Practice Models?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Tullai-McGuinness, Susan, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44016, USA
Contact Telephone:216-368-6335
Co-Authors:Elizabeth A. Madigan, PhD, RN, Associate Professor
While home healthcare nurses value some of the same attributes as
nurses in the magnet hospital studies (Flynn & Deatrick, 2003), it is not
known if home healthcare nurses experience a practice environment that is
reflective of the attributes they value. For this study, professional
values and DonabedianÆs SPO framework are used to describe how exercise of
autonomous practice is translated into the practice model and impacts RN
satisfaction. The purpose of this study is to describe how satisfied home
healthcare nurses are with their ability to exercise autonomous practice:
control over practice decisions and control over practice setting
decisions. A convenience sample of staff RNs (N=146) from Medicare
certified home healthcare agencies in Ohio (n=15) were surveyed. The
Participation in Decision Activities Questionnaire (PDAQ) and the Nurse
Work Index-Revised (NWI-R) measured exercise of autonomous practice and
the Global Appraisal of the Practice Environment measured exercise of
autonomous practice and satisfaction. Participants had an average age of
46 with 18.5 years of home care experience and almost 9 years of home
healthcare experience. The importance of participation in practice
decisions (mean=82.60, SD=17.23) to satisfaction was found to be slightly
more important than importance of participation in decisions related to
the practice setting (mean 77.41, SD=18.34). Using results from the NWI-R,
regression analysis showed that 34% of satisfaction could be contributed
to control over practice setting decisions and 24% to control over
practice decisions. Findings suggest that the home care practice
environment may not reflect the value of autonomy recognized by RNs as
important to job satisfaction. It will take the collective wisdom of
administration, nurses, and researchers to develop professional practice
models that will reflect nursing values while providing cost-effective,
quality care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIs the Value of Autonomy Reflected in Home Healthcare Practice Models?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160168-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Is the Value of Autonomy Reflected in Home Healthcare Practice Models?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tullai-McGuinness, Susan, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44016, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216-368-6335</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sxt32@case.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Elizabeth A. Madigan, PhD, RN, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">While home healthcare nurses value some of the same attributes as <br/> nurses in the magnet hospital studies (Flynn &amp; Deatrick, 2003), it is not <br/> known if home healthcare nurses experience a practice environment that is <br/> reflective of the attributes they value. For this study, professional <br/> values and Donabedian&AElig;s SPO framework are used to describe how exercise of <br/> autonomous practice is translated into the practice model and impacts RN <br/> satisfaction. The purpose of this study is to describe how satisfied home <br/> healthcare nurses are with their ability to exercise autonomous practice: <br/> control over practice decisions and control over practice setting <br/> decisions. A convenience sample of staff RNs (N=146) from Medicare <br/> certified home healthcare agencies in Ohio (n=15) were surveyed. The <br/> Participation in Decision Activities Questionnaire (PDAQ) and the Nurse <br/> Work Index-Revised (NWI-R) measured exercise of autonomous practice and <br/> the Global Appraisal of the Practice Environment measured exercise of <br/> autonomous practice and satisfaction. Participants had an average age of <br/> 46 with 18.5 years of home care experience and almost 9 years of home <br/> healthcare experience. The importance of participation in practice <br/> decisions (mean=82.60, SD=17.23) to satisfaction was found to be slightly <br/> more important than importance of participation in decisions related to <br/> the practice setting (mean 77.41, SD=18.34). Using results from the NWI-R, <br/> regression analysis showed that 34% of satisfaction could be contributed <br/> to control over practice setting decisions and 24% to control over <br/> practice decisions. Findings suggest that the home care practice <br/> environment may not reflect the value of autonomy recognized by RNs as <br/> important to job satisfaction. It will take the collective wisdom of <br/> administration, nurses, and researchers to develop professional practice <br/> models that will reflect nursing values while providing cost-effective, <br/> quality care.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:41:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:41:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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