Complex Environment Experience But Not Exercise Facilitates Dendritic Plasticity and Ameliorates Behavioral Impairment After Cerebral Ischemia

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160180
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Complex Environment Experience But Not Exercise Facilitates Dendritic Plasticity and Ameliorates Behavioral Impairment After Cerebral Ischemia
Abstract:
Complex Environment Experience But Not Exercise Facilitates Dendritic Plasticity and Ameliorates Behavioral Impairment After Cerebral Ischemia
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Woods, Julie, BS
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Research Coordinator
Contact Address:Medical-Surgical Nursing, 845 S. Damen Ave., M/C 802, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:(312) 355-0282
Co-Authors:Magdalena Wadowska, BS, Graduate Research Assistant; Magdalena Rogozinska, BS, Research Assistant; and Tess L Briones, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor
Although neuronal growth and restructuring have been reported as
compensatory changes that occur after CNS insult, it is not clear if they
correspond to functional improvement. Here we examined whether dendritic
growth and cognitive improvement can be enhanced by rehabilitation
training. Sixty-two adult male Wistar rats received either cerebral
ischemia or sham surgery. Within 3 days after surgery, animals in each
group were randomly assigned to either: complex environment housing (EC),
treadmill exercise (EX), or socially paired housing (controls). After 14
days of behavioral training, rats were tested for 8 days in the water maze
for: place learning (4 days) and cue-guided learning (4 days) with 2 days
of rest in between blocks of testing. Immunohistochemical results showed
increased expression of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2), a
substrate believed to be associated with the formation of dendrites, in
all ischemic rats and in sham animals housed in EC compared to the sham EX
and sham control groups. Interestingly, animals housed in EC have
significantly higher MAP2 expression overall. Behavioral analyses showed
significantly shorter mean swim latencies in both the place and cue-guided
learning tasks in animals assigned to EC compared to their EX and social
control counterparts. Furthermore, MAP2 expression accounted for 26% and
22% of the variance in swim latency in the place and cue-guided learning
task in EC rats, respectively. No significant differences were seen
between the ischemia EC and sham EC rats in MAP2 expression and functional
performance. These results suggest that rehabilitation training probably
enhanced compensatory dendritic restructuring after injury. Moreover,
enhancement of dendritic restructuring may have contributed to the
improvement of function in the EC rats. Thus, it is possible that EC but
not EX is more effective in enhancing dendritic plasticity and recovery of
function after cerebral ischemia. (Funded by NIH NR05260)
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComplex Environment Experience But Not Exercise Facilitates Dendritic Plasticity and Ameliorates Behavioral Impairment After Cerebral Ischemiaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160180-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Complex Environment Experience But Not Exercise Facilitates Dendritic Plasticity and Ameliorates Behavioral Impairment After Cerebral Ischemia</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Woods, Julie, BS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Coordinator</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Medical-Surgical Nursing, 845 S. Damen Ave., M/C 802, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(312) 355-0282</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jchai1@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Magdalena Wadowska, BS, Graduate Research Assistant; Magdalena Rogozinska, BS, Research Assistant; and Tess L Briones, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Although neuronal growth and restructuring have been reported as <br/> compensatory changes that occur after CNS insult, it is not clear if they <br/> correspond to functional improvement. Here we examined whether dendritic <br/> growth and cognitive improvement can be enhanced by rehabilitation <br/> training. Sixty-two adult male Wistar rats received either cerebral <br/> ischemia or sham surgery. Within 3 days after surgery, animals in each <br/> group were randomly assigned to either: complex environment housing (EC), <br/> treadmill exercise (EX), or socially paired housing (controls). After 14 <br/> days of behavioral training, rats were tested for 8 days in the water maze <br/> for: place learning (4 days) and cue-guided learning (4 days) with 2 days <br/> of rest in between blocks of testing. Immunohistochemical results showed <br/> increased expression of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2), a <br/> substrate believed to be associated with the formation of dendrites, in <br/> all ischemic rats and in sham animals housed in EC compared to the sham EX <br/> and sham control groups. Interestingly, animals housed in EC have <br/> significantly higher MAP2 expression overall. Behavioral analyses showed <br/> significantly shorter mean swim latencies in both the place and cue-guided <br/> learning tasks in animals assigned to EC compared to their EX and social <br/> control counterparts. Furthermore, MAP2 expression accounted for 26% and <br/> 22% of the variance in swim latency in the place and cue-guided learning <br/> task in EC rats, respectively. No significant differences were seen <br/> between the ischemia EC and sham EC rats in MAP2 expression and functional <br/> performance. These results suggest that rehabilitation training probably <br/> enhanced compensatory dendritic restructuring after injury. Moreover, <br/> enhancement of dendritic restructuring may have contributed to the <br/> improvement of function in the EC rats. Thus, it is possible that EC but <br/> not EX is more effective in enhancing dendritic plasticity and recovery of <br/> function after cerebral ischemia. (Funded by NIH NR05260)</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:42:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:42:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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