Predictors of Smoking Abstinence, Recidivism, and Recalcitrance Following a Cessation Program

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160181
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predictors of Smoking Abstinence, Recidivism, and Recalcitrance Following a Cessation Program
Abstract:
Predictors of Smoking Abstinence, Recidivism, and Recalcitrance Following a Cessation Program
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Wynd, Christine, PhD, RN, CNAA
P.I. Institution Name:University of Akron
Title:Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 209 Carroll Street, Akron, OH, 44325-3701, USA
Contact Telephone:330-972-5164
Purpose: Smoking cessation programs are frequently attended by
hardcore smokers who fail to quit smoking. Nurses must understand smokers
and target interventions that will aid long-term abstinence. This study
was designed to identify predictors of long-term smoking abstinence,
recidivism, and recalcitrance following participation in a cessation
program. Conceptual Framework: Smokers achieving long-term abstinence
following cessation were predicted to have lower initial smoking rates,
fewer years of lifetime smoking, anti-smoking attitudes, and greater
numbers of healthy behaviors when compared to recidivists and recalcitrant
smokers. Subjects: Adult smokers, aged 18 to 60 years old, completed a
cessation program and were followed for two years (N=71). Methods: A
descriptive design required the use of discriminant function analysis
(DFA) to predict membership in three groups of smokers: successful
abstainers, who quit and remained smoke-free after two years (n=14),
recidivists, who relapsed during follow-up (n=29), and the recalcitrant or
hardcore smokers who made no attempts to quit smoking during the entire
cessation and follow-up period (n=28). Results: The DFA produced two
discriminant functions: (1) "successful abstinence" accounted for 70% of
group variance with predictors including lower smoking rates, fewer years
of smoking, attitudes less favorable toward smoking, and healthy behaviors
of good nutrition, exercise, and stress management; (2) "failure to quit"
accounted for 30% of the variance with predictors including more
pro-smoking attitudes, less spiritual growth, and fewer healthy behaviors
overall. Conclusions: Nurses who conduct smoking cessation interventions
should assess and identify those smokers who may be at risk for failure
due to higher smoking rates and more numerous years of smoking. Cessation
interventions should include creative content and activities that promote
anti-smoking attitudes, actively encourage improved exercise and diet, as
well as stress management techniques to aid long-term abstinence.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredictors of Smoking Abstinence, Recidivism, and Recalcitrance Following a Cessation Programen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160181-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Predictors of Smoking Abstinence, Recidivism, and Recalcitrance Following a Cessation Program</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wynd, Christine, PhD, RN, CNAA</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Akron</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 209 Carroll Street, Akron, OH, 44325-3701, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">330-972-5164</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cwynd@uakron.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Smoking cessation programs are frequently attended by <br/> hardcore smokers who fail to quit smoking. Nurses must understand smokers <br/> and target interventions that will aid long-term abstinence. This study <br/> was designed to identify predictors of long-term smoking abstinence, <br/> recidivism, and recalcitrance following participation in a cessation <br/> program. Conceptual Framework: Smokers achieving long-term abstinence <br/> following cessation were predicted to have lower initial smoking rates, <br/> fewer years of lifetime smoking, anti-smoking attitudes, and greater <br/> numbers of healthy behaviors when compared to recidivists and recalcitrant <br/> smokers. Subjects: Adult smokers, aged 18 to 60 years old, completed a <br/> cessation program and were followed for two years (N=71). Methods: A <br/> descriptive design required the use of discriminant function analysis <br/> (DFA) to predict membership in three groups of smokers: successful <br/> abstainers, who quit and remained smoke-free after two years (n=14), <br/> recidivists, who relapsed during follow-up (n=29), and the recalcitrant or <br/> hardcore smokers who made no attempts to quit smoking during the entire <br/> cessation and follow-up period (n=28). Results: The DFA produced two <br/> discriminant functions: (1) &quot;successful abstinence&quot; accounted for 70% of <br/> group variance with predictors including lower smoking rates, fewer years <br/> of smoking, attitudes less favorable toward smoking, and healthy behaviors <br/> of good nutrition, exercise, and stress management; (2) &quot;failure to quit&quot; <br/> accounted for 30% of the variance with predictors including more <br/> pro-smoking attitudes, less spiritual growth, and fewer healthy behaviors <br/> overall. Conclusions: Nurses who conduct smoking cessation interventions <br/> should assess and identify those smokers who may be at risk for failure <br/> due to higher smoking rates and more numerous years of smoking. Cessation <br/> interventions should include creative content and activities that promote <br/> anti-smoking attitudes, actively encourage improved exercise and diet, as <br/> well as stress management techniques to aid long-term abstinence.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:42:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:42:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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