Incidence of Preeclampsia Among African-American And Hispanic Women in A Detroit Health System

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160184
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Incidence of Preeclampsia Among African-American And Hispanic Women in A Detroit Health System
Abstract:
Incidence of Preeclampsia Among African-American And Hispanic Women in A Detroit Health System
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Yeo, SeonAe, PhD, MSN, MS, NP
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Health Promotion, 400 North Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA
Contact Telephone:734-998-1030
Co-Authors:Edie Kieffer, PhD, MPH, Director
Purpose: Preeclampsia is a leading cause of maternal morbidity and
mortality. Yet, there is no consensus regarding the incidence among ethnic
minorities. Incidence of preelcampsia among African-American and Hispanic
populations in a large Detroit Health System was identified and verified
based on the diagnostic criteria by the ACOG. Subjects: A total of 2,747
African American and Hispanic women who gave birth at Henry Ford Hospital
(HFH) and a sample of 134 women from the same ethnic groups who used
HFH-affiliated outpatient prenatal clinics in 1998. Methods: Retrospective
cohort study. All labor and delivery records from the HFH system in 1998
were reviewed for the incidence of preeclampsia. The diagnostic criteria
(hypertension twice at least 6 hours apart and concurrent proteinuria
after 20 weeks gestation) were then verified by reviewing 710 prenatal
records from two outpatient clinics (576 at HFH Prenatal Clinic and 134 at
HFH-affiliated Community Health & Social Services Center). The results
were tested by ANOVA for the continuous variables or by Chi-square (p <
/=.05). Results: The incidences of preelcampsia, according to the labor
and delivery records, was 5.5% for African Americans, 1.3% for Hispanics,
and 4% for Caucasian (X2=14.19; p < .05). When basing incidence on
diagnostic criteria found in the prenatal records, the incidence was 4.5%
for African Americans (26/576) and 1.5% for Hispanic (2/134). Identified
risk factors for African Americans included high blood pressure (p=.05),
history of chronic hypertension (p=.05), and older age (> 35) (p=.03),
based on ANOVA. Risk factors identified for Hispanic women were
nulliparity, family history of hypertension and BMI > 23.6. Conclusion:
Compared to African Americans, Hispanics had a significantly lower
incidence of preeclampsia. Also modifiable risk factors for Hispanic and
African-American women in Detroit were provided.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIncidence of Preeclampsia Among African-American And Hispanic Women in A Detroit Health Systemen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160184-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Incidence of Preeclampsia Among African-American And Hispanic Women in A Detroit Health System</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Yeo, SeonAe, PhD, MSN, MS, NP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Health Promotion, 400 North Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734-998-1030</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">seonaeyo@umich.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Edie Kieffer, PhD, MPH, Director</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Preeclampsia is a leading cause of maternal morbidity and <br/> mortality. Yet, there is no consensus regarding the incidence among ethnic <br/> minorities. Incidence of preelcampsia among African-American and Hispanic <br/> populations in a large Detroit Health System was identified and verified <br/> based on the diagnostic criteria by the ACOG. Subjects: A total of 2,747 <br/> African American and Hispanic women who gave birth at Henry Ford Hospital <br/> (HFH) and a sample of 134 women from the same ethnic groups who used <br/> HFH-affiliated outpatient prenatal clinics in 1998. Methods: Retrospective <br/> cohort study. All labor and delivery records from the HFH system in 1998 <br/> were reviewed for the incidence of preeclampsia. The diagnostic criteria <br/> (hypertension twice at least 6 hours apart and concurrent proteinuria <br/> after 20 weeks gestation) were then verified by reviewing 710 prenatal <br/> records from two outpatient clinics (576 at HFH Prenatal Clinic and 134 at <br/> HFH-affiliated Community Health &amp; Social Services Center). The results <br/> were tested by ANOVA for the continuous variables or by Chi-square (p &lt; <br/> /=.05). Results: The incidences of preelcampsia, according to the labor <br/> and delivery records, was 5.5% for African Americans, 1.3% for Hispanics, <br/> and 4% for Caucasian (X2=14.19; p &lt; .05). When basing incidence on <br/> diagnostic criteria found in the prenatal records, the incidence was 4.5% <br/> for African Americans (26/576) and 1.5% for Hispanic (2/134). Identified <br/> risk factors for African Americans included high blood pressure (p=.05), <br/> history of chronic hypertension (p=.05), and older age (&gt; 35) (p=.03), <br/> based on ANOVA. Risk factors identified for Hispanic women were <br/> nulliparity, family history of hypertension and BMI &gt; 23.6. Conclusion: <br/> Compared to African Americans, Hispanics had a significantly lower <br/> incidence of preeclampsia. Also modifiable risk factors for Hispanic and <br/> African-American women in Detroit were provided.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:42:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:42:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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