2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160185
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Heart Disease Risk Assessment for Asian Residents in Southeastern Michigan
Abstract:
Heart Disease Risk Assessment for Asian Residents in Southeastern Michigan
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Yu, Mei-yu, PhD, MD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Title:Director
Contact Address:Nursing Department, 400 N. Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA
Contact Telephone:7349368950
Co-Authors:Cuijuan Cai, PhD, Research Coordinator; Oi Saeng Hong, PhD, Assistant Professor; Lixin Song, MA, RN, Clinical Nurse Researcher; and Jung Eun Ko, MA, Project Coordinator
Heart disease is the leading causes of death in the United States.
However, the statistics for heart disease among Asian Americans are rarely
known. This study aimed to assess heart disease risks among Asian
residents in Southeastern Michigan. During two health promotion events
held in 2004, a series of health screenings were conducted, including
blood pressure, total blood cholesterol, and HDL cholesterol level. Event
registration form asked about participantsÆ age, gender, and ethnicity,
availability of health insurance, physically activity, and smoking
history. Data analysis included 118 Asian residents (71 women and 47 men)
aged 20 and older (mean age=56, S.D.=15). Eighty-one percent of them had
no health insurance, 66% had pre-hypertension or hypertension, 44% had
borderline or undesirable total cholesterol, 25% had undesirable HDL, 51%
were not physically active, and 19% were smokers. Using information from
the Framingham Heart Study, a risk assessment tool was used to estimate a
personÆs 10-year risk of having a heart attack
(http://hp2010.nhlbihin.net/atpiii/calculator.asp, 2004). The results
showed that the mean estimated risk level of having a heart attack in the
next 10 years for the 118 Asian residents was 7.4% (S.D.=.07), and 30% of
them had a risk level 10% or higher. Both genders had risks but the risk
level is significantly higher among men (t=-7.6, significance=.000,
2-tailed). Multiple regression analysis indicated that age, gender, HDL,
and availability of health insurance are significant predictors of
people's risks (adjusted R square=.82). To improve access to health care
and provide culturally competent health promotion are urgent strategies
needed to reduce risk factors of heart disease and prevent heart attacks
among Asian Americans. Acknowledgements: Thanks for the support of the University of Michigan
Health System, contributions by Jun Hoe Kim and other volunteers, and
editorial suggestions by Linh Song.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHeart Disease Risk Assessment for Asian Residents in Southeastern Michiganen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160185-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Heart Disease Risk Assessment for Asian Residents in Southeastern Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Yu, Mei-yu, PhD, MD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing Department, 400 N. Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">7349368950</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">yujiang@umich.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Cuijuan Cai, PhD, Research Coordinator; Oi Saeng Hong, PhD, Assistant Professor; Lixin Song, MA, RN, Clinical Nurse Researcher; and Jung Eun Ko, MA, Project Coordinator</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Heart disease is the leading causes of death in the United States. <br/> However, the statistics for heart disease among Asian Americans are rarely <br/> known. This study aimed to assess heart disease risks among Asian <br/> residents in Southeastern Michigan. During two health promotion events <br/> held in 2004, a series of health screenings were conducted, including <br/> blood pressure, total blood cholesterol, and HDL cholesterol level. Event <br/> registration form asked about participants&AElig; age, gender, and ethnicity, <br/> availability of health insurance, physically activity, and smoking <br/> history. Data analysis included 118 Asian residents (71 women and 47 men) <br/> aged 20 and older (mean age=56, S.D.=15). Eighty-one percent of them had <br/> no health insurance, 66% had pre-hypertension or hypertension, 44% had <br/> borderline or undesirable total cholesterol, 25% had undesirable HDL, 51% <br/> were not physically active, and 19% were smokers. Using information from <br/> the Framingham Heart Study, a risk assessment tool was used to estimate a <br/> person&AElig;s 10-year risk of having a heart attack <br/> (http://hp2010.nhlbihin.net/atpiii/calculator.asp, 2004). The results <br/> showed that the mean estimated risk level of having a heart attack in the <br/> next 10 years for the 118 Asian residents was 7.4% (S.D.=.07), and 30% of <br/> them had a risk level 10% or higher. Both genders had risks but the risk <br/> level is significantly higher among men (t=-7.6, significance=.000, <br/> 2-tailed). Multiple regression analysis indicated that age, gender, HDL, <br/> and availability of health insurance are significant predictors of <br/> people's risks (adjusted R square=.82). To improve access to health care <br/> and provide culturally competent health promotion are urgent strategies <br/> needed to reduce risk factors of heart disease and prevent heart attacks <br/> among Asian Americans. Acknowledgements: Thanks for the support of the University of Michigan <br/> Health System, contributions by Jun Hoe Kim and other volunteers, and <br/> editorial suggestions by Linh Song.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:42:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:42:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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