Nursing Practice Models and Decision Making: Variations Among Generational Cohorts

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160191
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing Practice Models and Decision Making: Variations Among Generational Cohorts
Abstract:
Nursing Practice Models and Decision Making: Variations Among Generational Cohorts
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Anthony, Mary, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Kent State University
Contact Address:P. O. Box 5190, 113 Henderson Hall, Kent, OH, 44242, USA
Co-Authors:S. Tullai-McGuinness, Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH; and L. Capone, Nursing Quality, Cleveland Clinic , Cleveland, OH
Objective: Today's nursing workforce is comprised of four different generations that bring with them diverse social, political and economic experiences that influence their worldview and value systems. The extent that generational values influence nursing practice is unknown. Purpose: This secondary analysis compares nurses from two generational cohorts on processes crucial to effective nursing care delivery. Methods: Three data sets collected in 1994 (Sample 1), 1997-1998 (Sample 2), and 2002-2004 (Sample 3) consisted of nurses who were surveyed regarding their perceptions of autonomy for and participation in decision making for decisions related to direct patient care and for managing the practice environment. Instruments included The Participation in Decision Activities Questionnaire (Anthony, 1997) and Nursing Work Index (Aiken and Patrician, 2000). The first step in conducting this analysis was the identification of the age in each data set that defined the generations (Baby Boomer or Gen X). In Sample 1 data were collected from 300 RNs in 13 hospitals. The average age was 38.9 years and 75% were Baby Boomers. In Sample 2, data were collected from 267 nurses working in 3 hospitals. The average age was 34.3 years and 42% were Baby Boomers. In Sample 3, data were collected on 201 nurses in 19 Home Healthcare agencies. The average age was 45.1 years and 75% were Baby Boomers. Results: Using independent t-tests, in Sample 1, there were no significant differences between Baby Boomer and Gen X nurses in their participation for decisions related to either direct patient care or decisions about the practice environment. In Sample 2, there was a statistically significant difference in Gen X nurses participation in the identification phase of decision making for patient care decisions. Similarly, in Sample 3, there was a statistically significant difference in Gen X nurses participation in their control over practice and practice setting decisions. Conclusion: In two of three samples, Gen X nurses had greater participation in decision making and autonomy which may suggest that differences among generational cohorts go beyond generational values and thus possibly translate into variations in nursing practice behaviors that can potentially affect outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing Practice Models and Decision Making: Variations Among Generational Cohortsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160191-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nursing Practice Models and Decision Making: Variations Among Generational Cohorts</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Anthony, Mary, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Kent State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">P. O. Box 5190, 113 Henderson Hall, Kent, OH, 44242, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">manthony@kent.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">S. Tullai-McGuinness, Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH; and L. Capone, Nursing Quality, Cleveland Clinic , Cleveland, OH</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Today's nursing workforce is comprised of four different generations that bring with them diverse social, political and economic experiences that influence their worldview and value systems. The extent that generational values influence nursing practice is unknown. Purpose: This secondary analysis compares nurses from two generational cohorts on processes crucial to effective nursing care delivery. Methods: Three data sets collected in 1994 (Sample 1), 1997-1998 (Sample 2), and 2002-2004 (Sample 3) consisted of nurses who were surveyed regarding their perceptions of autonomy for and participation in decision making for decisions related to direct patient care and for managing the practice environment. Instruments included The Participation in Decision Activities Questionnaire (Anthony, 1997) and Nursing Work Index (Aiken and Patrician, 2000). The first step in conducting this analysis was the identification of the age in each data set that defined the generations (Baby Boomer or Gen X). In Sample 1 data were collected from 300 RNs in 13 hospitals. The average age was 38.9 years and 75% were Baby Boomers. In Sample 2, data were collected from 267 nurses working in 3 hospitals. The average age was 34.3 years and 42% were Baby Boomers. In Sample 3, data were collected on 201 nurses in 19 Home Healthcare agencies. The average age was 45.1 years and 75% were Baby Boomers. Results: Using independent t-tests, in Sample 1, there were no significant differences between Baby Boomer and Gen X nurses in their participation for decisions related to either direct patient care or decisions about the practice environment. In Sample 2, there was a statistically significant difference in Gen X nurses participation in the identification phase of decision making for patient care decisions. Similarly, in Sample 3, there was a statistically significant difference in Gen X nurses participation in their control over practice and practice setting decisions. Conclusion: In two of three samples, Gen X nurses had greater participation in decision making and autonomy which may suggest that differences among generational cohorts go beyond generational values and thus possibly translate into variations in nursing practice behaviors that can potentially affect outcomes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:42:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:42:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.