2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160192
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Profile of Nurse-Managed Centers: Synthesis of Findings From Two National Surveys
Abstract:
Profile of Nurse-Managed Centers: Synthesis of Findings From Two National Surveys
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Barkauskas, Violet, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA
Co-Authors:J.M. Pohl and J. Moore, School of Nursing , University of Michigan, Ann Arbor , MI; R. Benkert, College of Nursing , Wayne State University , Detroit, MI; J. Nagelkerk, Kirkhof College of Nursing, Grand Valley State University, Grand Rapids, MI; and C.L.
Background: Evidence suggests that nurse-managed centers (NMCs) can serve an important role in primary health care systems. Yet, these centers remain somewhat invisible in the American health care system, largely because of limited data about their contributions to individual and community health care. Prior to the efforts described in this paper, few articles reported aggregate NMC data, and no national database of these centers and their services existed. NMC services are not commonly reported in national, ambulatory care databases. Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to synthesize and present NMC client and service data from two national surveys of NMCs, conducted in 2003 and 2005. Sample: A total of 64 academic NMCs responded to the 2003 survey and 29 NMCs provided data for the 2005 survey (73% of which were academic). In both surveys, data was sought from the population of academic NMCs (2003) and full primary care NMCs (2005). Between surveys, substantial work was accomplished in developing a valid, user-friendly, survey tool for periodic data collection from NMCs, and for refining a standardized definition of a primary care NMC. Method: A descriptive study design using surveys was used. Results: Most NMCs remain small services (medians of 789 and 1,176 of annual unduplicated patients per center respectively between surveys, and medians of 2,318 and 4,001 encounters). However, findings demonstrated substantial variability in numbers of clients and encounters across NMCs. The majority of NMCs served clients of all ages and a diverse racial and ethnic client mix with an emphasis on uninsured, underinsured, and at-risk populations. The most frequently reported ICD-9-CM diagnoses centered on health supervision and chronic disease management categories. Community outreach and group health promotion activities are commonly offered by NMCs. Conclusions: Consistencies across studies provide a profile of key NMC characteristics. Generally, NMCs developed in response to unique community needs and hold promise for being an important component of the primary health care safety net. Documentation of unique nursing interventions and services, using standardized nursing languages, was limited.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleProfile of Nurse-Managed Centers: Synthesis of Findings From Two National Surveysen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160192-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Profile of Nurse-Managed Centers: Synthesis of Findings From Two National Surveys</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Barkauskas, Violet, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">vhbarkas@umich.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">J.M. Pohl and J. Moore, School of Nursing , University of Michigan, Ann Arbor , MI; R. Benkert, College of Nursing , Wayne State University , Detroit, MI; J. Nagelkerk, Kirkhof College of Nursing, Grand Valley State University, Grand Rapids, MI; and C.L.</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Evidence suggests that nurse-managed centers (NMCs) can serve an important role in primary health care systems. Yet, these centers remain somewhat invisible in the American health care system, largely because of limited data about their contributions to individual and community health care. Prior to the efforts described in this paper, few articles reported aggregate NMC data, and no national database of these centers and their services existed. NMC services are not commonly reported in national, ambulatory care databases. Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to synthesize and present NMC client and service data from two national surveys of NMCs, conducted in 2003 and 2005. Sample: A total of 64 academic NMCs responded to the 2003 survey and 29 NMCs provided data for the 2005 survey (73% of which were academic). In both surveys, data was sought from the population of academic NMCs (2003) and full primary care NMCs (2005). Between surveys, substantial work was accomplished in developing a valid, user-friendly, survey tool for periodic data collection from NMCs, and for refining a standardized definition of a primary care NMC. Method: A descriptive study design using surveys was used. Results: Most NMCs remain small services (medians of 789 and 1,176 of annual unduplicated patients per center respectively between surveys, and medians of 2,318 and 4,001 encounters). However, findings demonstrated substantial variability in numbers of clients and encounters across NMCs. The majority of NMCs served clients of all ages and a diverse racial and ethnic client mix with an emphasis on uninsured, underinsured, and at-risk populations. The most frequently reported ICD-9-CM diagnoses centered on health supervision and chronic disease management categories. Community outreach and group health promotion activities are commonly offered by NMCs. Conclusions: Consistencies across studies provide a profile of key NMC characteristics. Generally, NMCs developed in response to unique community needs and hold promise for being an important component of the primary health care safety net. Documentation of unique nursing interventions and services, using standardized nursing languages, was limited.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:42:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:42:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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