Adolescent Mothers' Age-Discrepant Partners Have More Problem Behaviors Than Age-Consistent Partners

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160193
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Adolescent Mothers' Age-Discrepant Partners Have More Problem Behaviors Than Age-Consistent Partners
Abstract:
Adolescent Mothers' Age-Discrepant Partners Have More Problem Behaviors Than Age-Consistent Partners
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Baylor, Julie, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Bradley University
Contact Address:Nursing, 1501 W. Bradley Ave, Peoria, IL, 61625, USA
Co-Authors:L. H. Flick, S.M. Homan, and C. Campbell, Public Health, St. Louis University, St. Louis, MO; C.A. Cook and M. Gallagher, Social Service, St. Louis University, St. Louis, MO; M. McSweeney, Nursing, St. Louis University, St. Louis , MO; and L. Parnell, Soc
Adolescent girls in relationships with males who are at least 5 years older are more likely to become parents. Data suggest age-discrepant fathers are immature for their age and may have more problem behaviors. Studies are few and limited by confounding socioeconomic characteristics and missing data from unidentified fathers. This cross-sectional study of 173 WIC enrolled pregnant women aged 13-18 compared the problem characteristics of age-discrepant and age-consistent fathers. The sample is a subset of a cohort of 744 pregnant women recruited from rural and urban WIC sites and stratified by race to be representative of the counties sampled. Most interviews were done in the second and third trimester. The selected women answered questions about the baby's father including: substances used, weapon carrying, fighting, other children and illegal activities. Data is available on 171 fathers, aged 13-65, with 31% at least 5 years older than the mother at the time of the interview. A father's problem behavior scale with two subscales was created for this study. Problem behaviors were grouped conceptually to form two subscales: substance use and social behavioral characteristics as well as summed to form an overall problem behavior score. Logistic regression, adjusting for mother's race and residence (urban/rural), indicated that age-discrepant fathers were 3 times more likely to use alcohol (OR3.3; 95%CI1.6-6.5), more likely to be heavy users of alcohol (OR6.5; 95%CI2.7-15.8), more likely to have more than one other child (OR15.3; 95%CI4.9-48.1) and to have children with other women (OR7.9; 95%CI3.7-16.7). Multiple linear regression using the problem behavior scale score and controlling for mother's race and residence indicated the average number of problem behaviors for age-discrepant fathers was 3.2 (SD2.1) and for age-consistent fathers was 1.8 (SD1.6). That is, age-discrepant fathers had almost twice as many problem behaviors as age-consistent fathers, independent of race and urban or rural residence. Additional research should identify adolescent females at increased risk for developing a relationship with much older males. Nurses can play an important role in identifying adolescent females at risk and in teaching them to avoid exploitation by older males.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdolescent Mothers' Age-Discrepant Partners Have More Problem Behaviors Than Age-Consistent Partnersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160193-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Adolescent Mothers' Age-Discrepant Partners Have More Problem Behaviors Than Age-Consistent Partners</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Baylor, Julie, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Bradley University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing, 1501 W. Bradley Ave, Peoria, IL, 61625, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jksb@bradley.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">L. H. Flick, S.M. Homan, and C. Campbell, Public Health, St. Louis University, St. Louis, MO; C.A. Cook and M. Gallagher, Social Service, St. Louis University, St. Louis, MO; M. McSweeney, Nursing, St. Louis University, St. Louis , MO; and L. Parnell, Soc</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Adolescent girls in relationships with males who are at least 5 years older are more likely to become parents. Data suggest age-discrepant fathers are immature for their age and may have more problem behaviors. Studies are few and limited by confounding socioeconomic characteristics and missing data from unidentified fathers. This cross-sectional study of 173 WIC enrolled pregnant women aged 13-18 compared the problem characteristics of age-discrepant and age-consistent fathers. The sample is a subset of a cohort of 744 pregnant women recruited from rural and urban WIC sites and stratified by race to be representative of the counties sampled. Most interviews were done in the second and third trimester. The selected women answered questions about the baby's father including: substances used, weapon carrying, fighting, other children and illegal activities. Data is available on 171 fathers, aged 13-65, with 31% at least 5 years older than the mother at the time of the interview. A father's problem behavior scale with two subscales was created for this study. Problem behaviors were grouped conceptually to form two subscales: substance use and social behavioral characteristics as well as summed to form an overall problem behavior score. Logistic regression, adjusting for mother's race and residence (urban/rural), indicated that age-discrepant fathers were 3 times more likely to use alcohol (OR3.3; 95%CI1.6-6.5), more likely to be heavy users of alcohol (OR6.5; 95%CI2.7-15.8), more likely to have more than one other child (OR15.3; 95%CI4.9-48.1) and to have children with other women (OR7.9; 95%CI3.7-16.7). Multiple linear regression using the problem behavior scale score and controlling for mother's race and residence indicated the average number of problem behaviors for age-discrepant fathers was 3.2 (SD2.1) and for age-consistent fathers was 1.8 (SD1.6). That is, age-discrepant fathers had almost twice as many problem behaviors as age-consistent fathers, independent of race and urban or rural residence. Additional research should identify adolescent females at increased risk for developing a relationship with much older males. Nurses can play an important role in identifying adolescent females at risk and in teaching them to avoid exploitation by older males.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:42:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:42:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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