Nursing Students' and Older Adults' Perceptions of a Longitudinal Community-Based Clinical Experience

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160194
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing Students' and Older Adults' Perceptions of a Longitudinal Community-Based Clinical Experience
Abstract:
Nursing Students' and Older Adults' Perceptions of a Longitudinal Community-Based Clinical Experience
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Beel-Bates, Cindy, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Grand Valley State University
Contact Address:Nursing, 301 Michigan, Grand Rapids, MI, 49503, USA
Co-Authors:R. Davis and S. Jensen, Nursing, Grand Valley State University, Grand Rapids, MI
As the aging population increases, the need to integrate gerontology content into undergraduate nursing education becomes increasingly important. An innovative longitudinal (over four semesters) clinical assignment, called the Longitudinal Elder Initiative (LEI), pairs a beginning level nursing student with an older adult living in the community for the purpose of multiple geriatric assessments and client teaching. In order to evaluate the LEI, researchers used qualitative methods to explore the perceptions of students and older adult participants. Using a random sample of nine students (age 22-34) and nine older adults (age 72-92), data were gathered with a semi-structured interview that explored the LEI experience of both students and older adults. Interviews were audio-taped, transcribed, and analyzed for common themes. Researchers found that the LEI experience provided three main outcomes: mutual learning for the student and the older adult, an opportunity to build meaningful relationships that reverse stereotypes about the old and the young and positive health-outcomes for some older adults. These findings contribute to an understanding of ways in which nursing faculty can design clinical experiences in which students can learn about care of older adults in a positive holistic way while simultaneously contributing to the health and well-being of community dwelling older adults.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing Students' and Older Adults' Perceptions of a Longitudinal Community-Based Clinical Experienceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160194-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nursing Students' and Older Adults' Perceptions of a Longitudinal Community-Based Clinical Experience</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Beel-Bates, Cindy, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Grand Valley State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing, 301 Michigan, Grand Rapids, MI, 49503, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">beelbatc@gvsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">R. Davis and S. Jensen, Nursing, Grand Valley State University, Grand Rapids, MI</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">As the aging population increases, the need to integrate gerontology content into undergraduate nursing education becomes increasingly important. An innovative longitudinal (over four semesters) clinical assignment, called the Longitudinal Elder Initiative (LEI), pairs a beginning level nursing student with an older adult living in the community for the purpose of multiple geriatric assessments and client teaching. In order to evaluate the LEI, researchers used qualitative methods to explore the perceptions of students and older adult participants. Using a random sample of nine students (age 22-34) and nine older adults (age 72-92), data were gathered with a semi-structured interview that explored the LEI experience of both students and older adults. Interviews were audio-taped, transcribed, and analyzed for common themes. Researchers found that the LEI experience provided three main outcomes: mutual learning for the student and the older adult, an opportunity to build meaningful relationships that reverse stereotypes about the old and the young and positive health-outcomes for some older adults. These findings contribute to an understanding of ways in which nursing faculty can design clinical experiences in which students can learn about care of older adults in a positive holistic way while simultaneously contributing to the health and well-being of community dwelling older adults.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:42:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:42:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.