The Usability of Web Pages for Hospitalized Patients Who Are Diagnosed With Depression

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160195
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Usability of Web Pages for Hospitalized Patients Who Are Diagnosed With Depression
Abstract:
The Usability of Web Pages for Hospitalized Patients Who Are Diagnosed With Depression
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Belcher, Jan, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Wright State University
Contact Address:, 679 Greystone Dr., Bevercreek, OH, 45434, USA
Nurses are beginning to use web-based technology to successfully support discharged patients. The purpose of this descriptive study was to explore the usability of three web page designs for hospitalized patients who were within three days of home discharge and had a diagnosis of Major Depressive Disorder (296), single or recurrent. Usability is human interaction with computers examining effectiveness, efficiency and user satisfaction. In this study, usability was operationalized by observation of the patient during the computer interaction, patient's verbalization of the interaction, patient responses to exploratory usability questions and patient responses on the Web Depression Tool. Three informational web pages were designed in a simple, a medium, and a complex format. Complexity characteristics include font size, density of writing on web page, number of links, color background and number of graphics. On all web pages, all patients were asked to perform tasks such as using e-mail, chat rooms, and hyperlinks regardless of their previous computer use. The setting was a general 848 bed community hospital with a 32 bed acute psychiatric unit. The convenient sample (n=15 patients) was composed of 40% patients from a university psychiatric service comprised of primarily Medicaid and indigent patients. Mean age was 45 years old with a range from 18 years to 80 years. The sample was 53% female. There were two distinct patient groupings. Computer literate patients (80%, 12/15), preferred a more complex web site format with many links and information. Patients (3/15) who had no computer or Internet experience preferred the simpler web site with 16 font, one picture and four hyperlinks. Patients with no computer experience needed much guidance on accessing information using the web site. Most patients stated that they would use the web site information on medication and follow-up appointments. Several patients liked the mood assessment web feature. Patients agreed that they liked the crisis information but wanted another simpler format. Some (5/15) wanted the chat room. Two patients wanted personal journaling. Overall, most patients (14/15) were positive about using web sites at home.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Usability of Web Pages for Hospitalized Patients Who Are Diagnosed With Depressionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160195-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Usability of Web Pages for Hospitalized Patients Who Are Diagnosed With Depression</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Belcher, Jan, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wright State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, 679 Greystone Dr., Bevercreek, OH, 45434, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">janice.belcher@wright.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Nurses are beginning to use web-based technology to successfully support discharged patients. The purpose of this descriptive study was to explore the usability of three web page designs for hospitalized patients who were within three days of home discharge and had a diagnosis of Major Depressive Disorder (296), single or recurrent. Usability is human interaction with computers examining effectiveness, efficiency and user satisfaction. In this study, usability was operationalized by observation of the patient during the computer interaction, patient's verbalization of the interaction, patient responses to exploratory usability questions and patient responses on the Web Depression Tool. Three informational web pages were designed in a simple, a medium, and a complex format. Complexity characteristics include font size, density of writing on web page, number of links, color background and number of graphics. On all web pages, all patients were asked to perform tasks such as using e-mail, chat rooms, and hyperlinks regardless of their previous computer use. The setting was a general 848 bed community hospital with a 32 bed acute psychiatric unit. The convenient sample (n=15 patients) was composed of 40% patients from a university psychiatric service comprised of primarily Medicaid and indigent patients. Mean age was 45 years old with a range from 18 years to 80 years. The sample was 53% female. There were two distinct patient groupings. Computer literate patients (80%, 12/15), preferred a more complex web site format with many links and information. Patients (3/15) who had no computer or Internet experience preferred the simpler web site with 16 font, one picture and four hyperlinks. Patients with no computer experience needed much guidance on accessing information using the web site. Most patients stated that they would use the web site information on medication and follow-up appointments. Several patients liked the mood assessment web feature. Patients agreed that they liked the crisis information but wanted another simpler format. Some (5/15) wanted the chat room. Two patients wanted personal journaling. Overall, most patients (14/15) were positive about using web sites at home.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:42:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:42:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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