2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160197
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Role of Religiosity in College Students Vulnerable to Depression
Abstract:
The Role of Religiosity in College Students Vulnerable to Depression
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Berry, Devon, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Cincinnati
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 3081 Mirimar Street, Kettering, OH, 45409, USA
Depression is a growing problem for college students. Suicide, a consequence of depression, represents the second-leading cause of death in young adults. In recent years, religiosity has been shown to be consistently associated with lower levels of depression in many populations. Interest is growing in understanding the mechanism by which religiosity may relieve or protect individuals from depression. The purpose of this study was to test a model hypothesizing the nature of the relationships between religiosity and factors associated with the diathesis-stress model of depression, including stress, cognitive vulnerability, and depressive symptomology. A prospective repeated measures design utilized a convenience sample of 122 college-age students recruited through classroom presentations and e-mail invitations. Participants were asked to complete self-report measures of all variables at the beginning of the academic quarter. Measures of depression and stress were repeated at mid-quarter and prior to the end of the quarter. Ninety-three participants (76%) completed the survey at all three time points. The measurement of religiosity was dimensionalized through the use four separate measures of the construct. The diathesis-stress model was not supported by the data; however, further analysis indicated that religiosity may potentiate the relationship between stress and future depression. That is, participants who were highly religious reported more depressive symptomology when stressed than those who were less religious. This unexpected finding suggests that more research is needed in the area of depression and religiosity to clarify the nature of the relationship among these factors as well as potential unintended effects of religiosity. Future research should incorporate the use of non-convenience samples from both the general and clinical populations. Efforts should also be made to extend the assessment period over a longer time to enhance the probability of observing the interaction theorized in the diathesis-stress model. Prior to the safe and effective incorporation of religious and spiritual elements into the mental health care of college students, more must be understood about the mechanism explaining the association between these factors.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Role of Religiosity in College Students Vulnerable to Depressionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160197-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Role of Religiosity in College Students Vulnerable to Depression</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Berry, Devon, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Cincinnati</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 3081 Mirimar Street, Kettering, OH, 45409, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">devon.berry@uc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Depression is a growing problem for college students. Suicide, a consequence of depression, represents the second-leading cause of death in young adults. In recent years, religiosity has been shown to be consistently associated with lower levels of depression in many populations. Interest is growing in understanding the mechanism by which religiosity may relieve or protect individuals from depression. The purpose of this study was to test a model hypothesizing the nature of the relationships between religiosity and factors associated with the diathesis-stress model of depression, including stress, cognitive vulnerability, and depressive symptomology. A prospective repeated measures design utilized a convenience sample of 122 college-age students recruited through classroom presentations and e-mail invitations. Participants were asked to complete self-report measures of all variables at the beginning of the academic quarter. Measures of depression and stress were repeated at mid-quarter and prior to the end of the quarter. Ninety-three participants (76%) completed the survey at all three time points. The measurement of religiosity was dimensionalized through the use four separate measures of the construct. The diathesis-stress model was not supported by the data; however, further analysis indicated that religiosity may potentiate the relationship between stress and future depression. That is, participants who were highly religious reported more depressive symptomology when stressed than those who were less religious. This unexpected finding suggests that more research is needed in the area of depression and religiosity to clarify the nature of the relationship among these factors as well as potential unintended effects of religiosity. Future research should incorporate the use of non-convenience samples from both the general and clinical populations. Efforts should also be made to extend the assessment period over a longer time to enhance the probability of observing the interaction theorized in the diathesis-stress model. Prior to the safe and effective incorporation of religious and spiritual elements into the mental health care of college students, more must be understood about the mechanism explaining the association between these factors.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:43:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:43:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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