Symptom Prevalence, Experience and Functional Status Among Urban HIV-Infected African American Men

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160199
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Symptom Prevalence, Experience and Functional Status Among Urban HIV-Infected African American Men
Abstract:
Symptom Prevalence, Experience and Functional Status Among Urban HIV-Infected African American Men
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Buseh, Aaron, PhD, MPH
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Contact Address:CON - Cunningham Hall, Room 569, 1921 East Hartford Avenue, Milwaukee, WI, 53211, USA
Co-Authors:S.T. Kelber, and S. Patricia, College of Nursing, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI and C.G. Park, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL
Purpose: Managing complex symptoms associated with HIV/AIDS are critical to the functional status of HIV-infected individuals. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships between contextual factors, symptom status, healthcare barriers, life satisfaction, general health perceptions, and functional status among HIV-infected African American men. Subjects: The sample consisted of (n=55) HIV-infected African American men residing in an urban setting. The study sample ranged in age 18-77 years, (M = 48.84, SD= 7.67) and the average length of time since diagnosis with HIV infection was (M = 10.79 years SD= 6.4). Methods: Cross-sectional study that comprised the administration of a survey questionnaire to men who reported being diagnosed with HIV infection. Measures were collected on: contextual factors, symptom status, healthcare barriers, general health perceptions, life satisfaction and functional status among HIV-infected African American men. Results: Participants reported experiencing between 4 and 62 (M=37.25 SD=21.58) symptoms on the Holzemer symptom check list. The most prevalent and intense symptoms reported were: fatigue (98.2%); fear (92.7%); shortness of breath (92.7%); gastrointestinal related symptoms (85.5%), and numbness (80.0%). Contextual factors did not contribute significantly to explaining functional status. The index of health symptoms explained 15.7% of the variance in functional status. After adjusting for the index of health symptoms, life satisfaction and general health perceptions significantly explained an additional 26.4% of the variance in functional status of HIV-infected men in this study. Conclusions: Results of this study confirms the complexities of symptoms experienced by HIV-infected individuals. To improve functionality of HIV-infected individuals, it is essential to move beyond the narrow focus on physical symptoms experiences alone; rather, comprehensive interventions should be developed that also focuses on other aspects of self-care including life satisfaction, health care barriers, and general perceptions of health.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSymptom Prevalence, Experience and Functional Status Among Urban HIV-Infected African American Menen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160199-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Symptom Prevalence, Experience and Functional Status Among Urban HIV-Infected African American Men</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Buseh, Aaron, PhD, MPH</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON - Cunningham Hall, Room 569, 1921 East Hartford Avenue, Milwaukee, WI, 53211, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">aaronbg@uwm.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">S.T. Kelber, and S. Patricia, College of Nursing, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI and C.G. Park, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Managing complex symptoms associated with HIV/AIDS are critical to the functional status of HIV-infected individuals. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships between contextual factors, symptom status, healthcare barriers, life satisfaction, general health perceptions, and functional status among HIV-infected African American men. Subjects: The sample consisted of (n=55) HIV-infected African American men residing in an urban setting. The study sample ranged in age 18-77 years, (M = 48.84, SD= 7.67) and the average length of time since diagnosis with HIV infection was (M = 10.79 years SD= 6.4). Methods: Cross-sectional study that comprised the administration of a survey questionnaire to men who reported being diagnosed with HIV infection. Measures were collected on: contextual factors, symptom status, healthcare barriers, general health perceptions, life satisfaction and functional status among HIV-infected African American men. Results: Participants reported experiencing between 4 and 62 (M=37.25 SD=21.58) symptoms on the Holzemer symptom check list. The most prevalent and intense symptoms reported were: fatigue (98.2%); fear (92.7%); shortness of breath (92.7%); gastrointestinal related symptoms (85.5%), and numbness (80.0%). Contextual factors did not contribute significantly to explaining functional status. The index of health symptoms explained 15.7% of the variance in functional status. After adjusting for the index of health symptoms, life satisfaction and general health perceptions significantly explained an additional 26.4% of the variance in functional status of HIV-infected men in this study. Conclusions: Results of this study confirms the complexities of symptoms experienced by HIV-infected individuals. To improve functionality of HIV-infected individuals, it is essential to move beyond the narrow focus on physical symptoms experiences alone; rather, comprehensive interventions should be developed that also focuses on other aspects of self-care including life satisfaction, health care barriers, and general perceptions of health.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:43:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:43:08Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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