2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160201
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Self-Cognitions and Mild Depressive Symptoms in Urban Youth
Abstract:
Self-Cognitions and Mild Depressive Symptoms in Urban Youth
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Corte, Colleen, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Contact Address:, 845 S. Damen, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Researchers have suggested that depression may reflect an abundance of negative self-cognitions (Beck, 1967; Segal, 1988, Taylor & Ingram, 1999). Less is known about the relationship between self-cognitions and depressive symptoms in community-based samples. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the number of positive and negative self-cognitions and depressive symptoms in 9-13 year old primarily African American (68%) and Latino (29%) youth (N=28) recruited from summer youth programs in Chicago (M=10.3 + 1.1 years). The number of positive and negative self-cognitions included in the self-concept was measured by the number of positive (and negative) items endorsed as "really true for me" from the Harter Self-Perception Profile for Children (Harter, 1985). Depressive symptoms were measured with the sum score from the 27-item Children's Depression Inventory (CDI; Kovacs, 2003). Cronbach's alpha =.78. Depression scores ranged from 0-21 (M = 6.9, SD = 5.0), with only one child considered to have clinically significant depressive symptoms (mild). Even in this community-based sample of youth, the number of positive (r =.37, p =.056) and negative (r =.56, p=.002) self-cognitions were associated with depressive symptoms. Using a cutoff of 9 on the CDI which reflects the upper 50th percentile for depressive symptoms for age and gender matched youth (according to published norms), children with some mild depressive symptoms (n=9) had more negative self-cognitions than children without depressive symptoms (n=19) (6.3 vs 3.3, p=.03), and they also tended to have fewer positive self-cognitions (11.9 vs 15.3, p=.06). Findings suggest that a self-concept comprised of few positive and many negative self-cognitions may be a cognitive vulnerability for mild depressive symptoms in urban youth. Interventions aimed at fostering the development of healthy, positive domains of self-definition (e.g., academics, sports, music, art) in youth may serve to prevent or mitigate mild depressive symptoms by decreasing the relative proportion (and thus accessibility in memory) of negative self-cognitions. Funded by the Center for Reducing Risks in Vulnerable Populations NIN/NINR #P30 NRO9014 (University of Illinois at Chicago College of Nursing).
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSelf-Cognitions and Mild Depressive Symptoms in Urban Youthen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160201-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Self-Cognitions and Mild Depressive Symptoms in Urban Youth</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Corte, Colleen, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, 845 S. Damen, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ccorte@uic.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Researchers have suggested that depression may reflect an abundance of negative self-cognitions (Beck, 1967; Segal, 1988, Taylor &amp; Ingram, 1999). Less is known about the relationship between self-cognitions and depressive symptoms in community-based samples. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the number of positive and negative self-cognitions and depressive symptoms in 9-13 year old primarily African American (68%) and Latino (29%) youth (N=28) recruited from summer youth programs in Chicago (M=10.3 + 1.1 years). The number of positive and negative self-cognitions included in the self-concept was measured by the number of positive (and negative) items endorsed as &quot;really true for me&quot; from the Harter Self-Perception Profile for Children (Harter, 1985). Depressive symptoms were measured with the sum score from the 27-item Children's Depression Inventory (CDI; Kovacs, 2003). Cronbach's alpha =.78. Depression scores ranged from 0-21 (M = 6.9, SD = 5.0), with only one child considered to have clinically significant depressive symptoms (mild). Even in this community-based sample of youth, the number of positive (r =.37, p =.056) and negative (r =.56, p=.002) self-cognitions were associated with depressive symptoms. Using a cutoff of 9 on the CDI which reflects the upper 50th percentile for depressive symptoms for age and gender matched youth (according to published norms), children with some mild depressive symptoms (n=9) had more negative self-cognitions than children without depressive symptoms (n=19) (6.3 vs 3.3, p=.03), and they also tended to have fewer positive self-cognitions (11.9 vs 15.3, p=.06). Findings suggest that a self-concept comprised of few positive and many negative self-cognitions may be a cognitive vulnerability for mild depressive symptoms in urban youth. Interventions aimed at fostering the development of healthy, positive domains of self-definition (e.g., academics, sports, music, art) in youth may serve to prevent or mitigate mild depressive symptoms by decreasing the relative proportion (and thus accessibility in memory) of negative self-cognitions. Funded by the Center for Reducing Risks in Vulnerable Populations NIN/NINR #P30 NRO9014 (University of Illinois at Chicago College of Nursing).</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:43:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:43:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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