2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160202
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Pain Management in Infants During Immunizations: Use of Oral Sucrose
Abstract:
Pain Management in Infants During Immunizations: Use of Oral Sucrose
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Curry, Donna, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Wright State University
Contact Address:, 3540 Colonel Glenn Hwy, Dayton, OH, 45435, USA
Co-Authors:C. Asher, , Dayton Childrens Medical Center, Dayton, OH and S. Wrona, Columbus Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH
Background: Immunizations are a common source of pain for infants that is often overlooked and undertreated. Oral sucrose has been found to be a source of pain relief in neonates but limited research has found comparable benefits for older infants. Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of oral sucrose as an analgesic agent during routine immunizations for infants at 2-months, 4-months, and 6-months. Method: This study used an experimental, double blind design with randomized control. After IRB approval from appropriate agencies, healthy infants were recruited from 3 pediatric ambulatory clinics. A sample of 106 infants ages 2 months (n = 28), 4-months (n = 31) and 6-months (n = 32) were randomly assigned to the treatment groups. Two minutes prior to administration of routine immunizations they received 2ml orally of one of the following solutions via syringe: 50% sucrose, 75% sucrose or sterile water. Findings: When variables such as state prior to immunizations are controlled, a significant difference was found between treatment groups (F = 2.11, p = 00.7). Conclusions: Time since last feeding, consolability factors and temperament appear to influence the effectiveness of oral sucrose analgesia. Pain management for minor procedures and the role of these variables will be discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePain Management in Infants During Immunizations: Use of Oral Sucroseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160202-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Pain Management in Infants During Immunizations: Use of Oral Sucrose</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Curry, Donna, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wright State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, 3540 Colonel Glenn Hwy, Dayton, OH, 45435, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">donna.curry@wright.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">C. Asher, , Dayton Childrens Medical Center, Dayton, OH and S. Wrona, Columbus Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Immunizations are a common source of pain for infants that is often overlooked and undertreated. Oral sucrose has been found to be a source of pain relief in neonates but limited research has found comparable benefits for older infants. Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of oral sucrose as an analgesic agent during routine immunizations for infants at 2-months, 4-months, and 6-months. Method: This study used an experimental, double blind design with randomized control. After IRB approval from appropriate agencies, healthy infants were recruited from 3 pediatric ambulatory clinics. A sample of 106 infants ages 2 months (n = 28), 4-months (n = 31) and 6-months (n = 32) were randomly assigned to the treatment groups. Two minutes prior to administration of routine immunizations they received 2ml orally of one of the following solutions via syringe: 50% sucrose, 75% sucrose or sterile water. Findings: When variables such as state prior to immunizations are controlled, a significant difference was found between treatment groups (F = 2.11, p = 00.7). Conclusions: Time since last feeding, consolability factors and temperament appear to influence the effectiveness of oral sucrose analgesia. Pain management for minor procedures and the role of these variables will be discussed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:43:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:43:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.