2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160203
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Oral Health Disparities in Homeless Children at a Shelter-based Clinic
Abstract:
Oral Health Disparities in Homeless Children at a Shelter-based Clinic
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:DiMarco, Marguerite, PhDc, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Akron & Case Western Reserve University
Contact Address:College of Nursing, Valley City, OH, 44280, USA
Background and Significance. Women and children represent the fastest growing group of homeless individuals in the US, and the Surgeon General declared dental caries the "silent epidemic" with the worst oral health found among the poor. Reducing health disparities among at-risk and underserved populations is a national priority. The framework for this research was based on the Behavioral Model for Vulnerable Populations. Purpose. The purpose was to determine if oral health disparities occur in shelter families and the effect of shelter-based care on follow-up with a dentist. Methodology. A repeated-measures design, with data from the initial Pediatric Nurse Practitioner (PNP) assessment at the shelter and data one month later, was conducted using a convenience sample of mother-child dyads at a homeless shelter. Within one week of admission to the shelter, each family was assessed by a PNP. If caries were present, the name, number, and a phone to contact a dentist were provided to the mother. One month later, mothers were interviewed in-person by the PNP to determine if follow-up with a dentist had occurred. Caries in a child was assessed by Visual Dental Screening Tool administered by a PNP, and effect of shelter-based care was defined as any one of the children who had caries within a family being seen by a dentist within one month of the screening. Results. Data from 81 families who were predominantly African-American (68%) and homeless for two or more times (52%) showed that 43% of the 156 children at the shelter had never been to a dentist, and 31% had only been to a dentist more than one year earlier. Caries were found in 33% children and only 6% children were able to get to a dentist within one month. However, 33% of the families had scheduled dental appointments 1-3 months later. Conclusions and Implications. About one third of children admitted to shelters have one or more caries. Few were able to access a dentist within one month. Other priorities in homeless families prevented them from accessing dental care within a month. However, 33% of the families had dental appointments in another 1-3 months suggesting positive impact of shelter-based PNP care. Oral health disparities in homeless children/families were confirmed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOral Health Disparities in Homeless Children at a Shelter-based Clinicen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160203-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Oral Health Disparities in Homeless Children at a Shelter-based Clinic</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">DiMarco, Marguerite, PhDc, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Akron &amp; Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, Valley City, OH, 44280, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dimarco@uakron.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background and Significance. Women and children represent the fastest growing group of homeless individuals in the US, and the Surgeon General declared dental caries the &quot;silent epidemic&quot; with the worst oral health found among the poor. Reducing health disparities among at-risk and underserved populations is a national priority. The framework for this research was based on the Behavioral Model for Vulnerable Populations. Purpose. The purpose was to determine if oral health disparities occur in shelter families and the effect of shelter-based care on follow-up with a dentist. Methodology. A repeated-measures design, with data from the initial Pediatric Nurse Practitioner (PNP) assessment at the shelter and data one month later, was conducted using a convenience sample of mother-child dyads at a homeless shelter. Within one week of admission to the shelter, each family was assessed by a PNP. If caries were present, the name, number, and a phone to contact a dentist were provided to the mother. One month later, mothers were interviewed in-person by the PNP to determine if follow-up with a dentist had occurred. Caries in a child was assessed by Visual Dental Screening Tool administered by a PNP, and effect of shelter-based care was defined as any one of the children who had caries within a family being seen by a dentist within one month of the screening. Results. Data from 81 families who were predominantly African-American (68%) and homeless for two or more times (52%) showed that 43% of the 156 children at the shelter had never been to a dentist, and 31% had only been to a dentist more than one year earlier. Caries were found in 33% children and only 6% children were able to get to a dentist within one month. However, 33% of the families had scheduled dental appointments 1-3 months later. Conclusions and Implications. About one third of children admitted to shelters have one or more caries. Few were able to access a dentist within one month. Other priorities in homeless families prevented them from accessing dental care within a month. However, 33% of the families had dental appointments in another 1-3 months suggesting positive impact of shelter-based PNP care. Oral health disparities in homeless children/families were confirmed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:43:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:43:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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