Navigating a Turbulent Course: Psychiatric Hospitalization Experience of Adolescents With Mood Disorders

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160205
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Navigating a Turbulent Course: Psychiatric Hospitalization Experience of Adolescents With Mood Disorders
Abstract:
Navigating a Turbulent Course: Psychiatric Hospitalization Experience of Adolescents With Mood Disorders
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Drew, Barbara, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Kent State University
Contact Address:CON - PO Box 5190, 113 Henderson Hall, Kent, OH, 44242-0001, USA
Co-Authors:C.B. Draucker, College of Nursing, Kent State University, Kent, OH and J.D. Varley, Department of Psychiatry, Summa Health System, Akron, OH
While the incidence and effects of adolescent mood disorders have been studied, researchers have not provided a dynamic description of how adolescents and their families manage symptoms, or identified factors that facilitate or hinder their use of mental health services. This information is needed to design interventions to prevent the negative sequelae of mood disorders in adolescents and to enhance service utilization. The purpose of this paper is to present a theoretical framework that describes the experience of mood disordered adolescents with psychiatric hospitalization. Grounded theory methods were used. 20 women and men ages 18-21 were recruited from the psychiatric inpatient units and intensive outpatient programs of 2 hospitals in Northeast Ohio. Inclusion criterion was hospitalization for treatment of a mood disorder that began prior to or during adolescence. We believe that young adults who can reflect on their adolescence in its entirety, but who are not far removed from the experience, can provide the relevant data. With the young adult's permission, we invited parents to participate (n = 10). The young adult sample included 14 women and 6 men. 17 participants were white. The mean age was 19 years. 19 were single. The parent sample included 3 fathers and 7 mothers. The participants' descriptions led us to characterize their experiences prior to, during and after psychiatric hospitalization as "navigating a turbulent course." The young people described lives marked by dramatic changes and/or chaotic family situations about which they could only signal their distress. The psychiatric hospital was described as a place one is temporarily taken to when in severe distress. This "port in the storm" is both protective and stifling. Leaving the port requires recharting one's course with a new plan for managing turbulence and a feeling of connection with those who are on a similar journey. The implications for practice are to: 1) explore and address the chaos; involve the family, 2) help the young person learn strategies for asking directly for help, 3) acknowledge the young person's experience of hospital as both sheltering and confining, and 4) include group therapy, aftercare group, and/or support group in discharge planning to reinforce treatment gains.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNavigating a Turbulent Course: Psychiatric Hospitalization Experience of Adolescents With Mood Disordersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160205-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Navigating a Turbulent Course: Psychiatric Hospitalization Experience of Adolescents With Mood Disorders</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Drew, Barbara, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Kent State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON - PO Box 5190, 113 Henderson Hall, Kent, OH, 44242-0001, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bdrew@kent.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">C.B. Draucker, College of Nursing, Kent State University, Kent, OH and J.D. Varley, Department of Psychiatry, Summa Health System, Akron, OH</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">While the incidence and effects of adolescent mood disorders have been studied, researchers have not provided a dynamic description of how adolescents and their families manage symptoms, or identified factors that facilitate or hinder their use of mental health services. This information is needed to design interventions to prevent the negative sequelae of mood disorders in adolescents and to enhance service utilization. The purpose of this paper is to present a theoretical framework that describes the experience of mood disordered adolescents with psychiatric hospitalization. Grounded theory methods were used. 20 women and men ages 18-21 were recruited from the psychiatric inpatient units and intensive outpatient programs of 2 hospitals in Northeast Ohio. Inclusion criterion was hospitalization for treatment of a mood disorder that began prior to or during adolescence. We believe that young adults who can reflect on their adolescence in its entirety, but who are not far removed from the experience, can provide the relevant data. With the young adult's permission, we invited parents to participate (n = 10). The young adult sample included 14 women and 6 men. 17 participants were white. The mean age was 19 years. 19 were single. The parent sample included 3 fathers and 7 mothers. The participants' descriptions led us to characterize their experiences prior to, during and after psychiatric hospitalization as &quot;navigating a turbulent course.&quot; The young people described lives marked by dramatic changes and/or chaotic family situations about which they could only signal their distress. The psychiatric hospital was described as a place one is temporarily taken to when in severe distress. This &quot;port in the storm&quot; is both protective and stifling. Leaving the port requires recharting one's course with a new plan for managing turbulence and a feeling of connection with those who are on a similar journey. The implications for practice are to: 1) explore and address the chaos; involve the family, 2) help the young person learn strategies for asking directly for help, 3) acknowledge the young person's experience of hospital as both sheltering and confining, and 4) include group therapy, aftercare group, and/or support group in discharge planning to reinforce treatment gains.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:43:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:43:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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