2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160206
Type:
Presentation
Title:
High-Tech Plagiarism Among Nursing Students: Ignorance or Intentional Deception?
Abstract:
High-Tech Plagiarism Among Nursing Students: Ignorance or Intentional Deception?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Dubas, Jenna, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:BryanLGH College of Health Sciences
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Lincoln, NE, 68506, USA
Co-Authors:J.E. Smith, School of Nursing, BryanLGH College of Health Sciences, Lincoln, NE and J.E. Smith, Research and Professional Practice Center, BryanLGH College of Health Sciences, Lincoln, NE
The Internet age has provided a potential wellspring of plagiaristic opportunities for college students. Researchers who have studied high-tech plagiarism among college students have reported prevalence rates of 12 to 25%, but research related to high-tech plagiarism among nursing students is lacking. This study used a convenience sample of 241 diploma and baccalaureate nursing students to investigate the relationship between high-tech plagiarism and (a) demographic variables, (b) nursing students' perceptions of cheating and (c) classroom and academic dishonesty. The students were surveyed using a 76-item questionnaire. Nearly one-third of nursing students admitted to engaging in high-tech plagiarism, with 30% of students reporting they submitted as their own work information that has been "cut and pasted" from an Internet website. Although 8.5% of students reported they have accessed websites that offer academic papers for sale, less than 2% of students admitted to submitting an academic paper from the Internet. Students who were most likely to report engaging in high-tech plagiarism were (a) enrolled in the diploma curriculum, (b) studied fewer hours, (c) believed most students approve of cheating and (d) believed that cheating is the only way some students can compete. Students who did not think a method of high-tech plagiarism constituted cheating were significantly more likely to participate in that plagiaristic behavior. Engagement in high-tech plagiarism was significantly correlated with engagement in classroom and clinical academic dishonesty. The findings indicated that plagiarizing by cutting and pasting from Internet websites was a common occurrence, and few nursing students believed this constituted cheating. Ignorance may thus be considered the root of this problem rather than intentional deception and moral corrosion. Nurse educators must clearly communicate to students what constitutes high-tech plagiarism, and how to avoid it. Conversely, the correlation between engagement in high-tech plagiarism and clinical academic dishonesty points to moral development as a root cause. Nurse educators and administrators also have the responsibility to define and enforce consequences for academic dishonesty in order to ultimately protect client safety.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHigh-Tech Plagiarism Among Nursing Students: Ignorance or Intentional Deception?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160206-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">High-Tech Plagiarism Among Nursing Students: Ignorance or Intentional Deception?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dubas, Jenna, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">BryanLGH College of Health Sciences</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Lincoln, NE, 68506, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jenna.dubas@bryanlgh.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">J.E. Smith, School of Nursing, BryanLGH College of Health Sciences, Lincoln, NE and J.E. Smith, Research and Professional Practice Center, BryanLGH College of Health Sciences, Lincoln, NE</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The Internet age has provided a potential wellspring of plagiaristic opportunities for college students. Researchers who have studied high-tech plagiarism among college students have reported prevalence rates of 12 to 25%, but research related to high-tech plagiarism among nursing students is lacking. This study used a convenience sample of 241 diploma and baccalaureate nursing students to investigate the relationship between high-tech plagiarism and (a) demographic variables, (b) nursing students' perceptions of cheating and (c) classroom and academic dishonesty. The students were surveyed using a 76-item questionnaire. Nearly one-third of nursing students admitted to engaging in high-tech plagiarism, with 30% of students reporting they submitted as their own work information that has been &quot;cut and pasted&quot; from an Internet website. Although 8.5% of students reported they have accessed websites that offer academic papers for sale, less than 2% of students admitted to submitting an academic paper from the Internet. Students who were most likely to report engaging in high-tech plagiarism were (a) enrolled in the diploma curriculum, (b) studied fewer hours, (c) believed most students approve of cheating and (d) believed that cheating is the only way some students can compete. Students who did not think a method of high-tech plagiarism constituted cheating were significantly more likely to participate in that plagiaristic behavior. Engagement in high-tech plagiarism was significantly correlated with engagement in classroom and clinical academic dishonesty. The findings indicated that plagiarizing by cutting and pasting from Internet websites was a common occurrence, and few nursing students believed this constituted cheating. Ignorance may thus be considered the root of this problem rather than intentional deception and moral corrosion. Nurse educators must clearly communicate to students what constitutes high-tech plagiarism, and how to avoid it. Conversely, the correlation between engagement in high-tech plagiarism and clinical academic dishonesty points to moral development as a root cause. Nurse educators and administrators also have the responsibility to define and enforce consequences for academic dishonesty in order to ultimately protect client safety.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:43:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:43:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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