2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160208
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Social Regulation of the Stress Response in the Transitional Newborn
Abstract:
Social Regulation of the Stress Response in the Transitional Newborn
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Elverson, Cynthia, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:South Dakota State University
Contact Address:College of Nursing, Brookings, SD, 57007-0098, USA
Co-Authors:M.E. Wilson, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE
Purpose & Background: Transitional newborns recover from stress related to labor and birth and respond to additional stressors during the first six hours of life. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships: (a) between social regulation behaviors and the cortisol response, and (b) between stressors and the cortisol response during the first six hours after birth. Participants: Forty-six mothers and their term infants participated at one hospital setting. Methods: The study was based on social regulation theory. A correlational design with repeated measurements was used. The Index of Mother-Infant Separation (IMIS) was used to measure the percent of observations in which the following behaviors were observed: (a) mother holding, (b) mother feeding, (c) father or other caregiver holding or feeding, and (d) treatments. Salivary cortisol was measured at 30 minutes of age, 2 hours of age, pre-bath, post-bath, and at 6 1/2 hours of age. Cortisol and age at each saliva collection were used to calculate area under the curve (AUC) indicators of total cortisol response and recovery phase of cortisol response. Results: A higher percentage of observations in which mother was holding infant was related to lower infant total cortisol response over the 6 hour period (r = -.24, p = .05, one-tailed). No other relationships were statistically significant. Implications: These results suggest that mother holding merits additional study as an approach to regulation of the cortisol response in transitional newborn infants.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSocial Regulation of the Stress Response in the Transitional Newbornen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160208-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Social Regulation of the Stress Response in the Transitional Newborn</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Elverson, Cynthia, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">South Dakota State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, Brookings, SD, 57007-0098, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cynthia.elverson@sdstate.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">M.E. Wilson, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose &amp; Background: Transitional newborns recover from stress related to labor and birth and respond to additional stressors during the first six hours of life. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships: (a) between social regulation behaviors and the cortisol response, and (b) between stressors and the cortisol response during the first six hours after birth. Participants: Forty-six mothers and their term infants participated at one hospital setting. Methods: The study was based on social regulation theory. A correlational design with repeated measurements was used. The Index of Mother-Infant Separation (IMIS) was used to measure the percent of observations in which the following behaviors were observed: (a) mother holding, (b) mother feeding, (c) father or other caregiver holding or feeding, and (d) treatments. Salivary cortisol was measured at 30 minutes of age, 2 hours of age, pre-bath, post-bath, and at 6 1/2 hours of age. Cortisol and age at each saliva collection were used to calculate area under the curve (AUC) indicators of total cortisol response and recovery phase of cortisol response. Results: A higher percentage of observations in which mother was holding infant was related to lower infant total cortisol response over the 6 hour period (r = -.24, p = .05, one-tailed). No other relationships were statistically significant. Implications: These results suggest that mother holding merits additional study as an approach to regulation of the cortisol response in transitional newborn infants.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:43:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:43:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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