Glucose Transporter Two Content Varies in the Small Intestine for Three and 21 Day Hypobaric Hypoxia

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160209
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Glucose Transporter Two Content Varies in the Small Intestine for Three and 21 Day Hypobaric Hypoxia
Abstract:
Glucose Transporter Two Content Varies in the Small Intestine for Three and 21 Day Hypobaric Hypoxia
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Fisher, Elaine, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Akron
Contact Address:College of Nursing, Mary Gladwin Hall 201K, Akron, OH, 44325-3701, USA
Co-Authors:J.C. LaManna, Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH
Background and Significance: The small intestine contributes to whole body glucose homeostasis via carrier mediated diffusion through the glucose transporter GLUT2. The gut plays an important role in the protective, restorative, and pathological response to an oxidative stress. Sustained hypoxia may alter GLUT2 transporter content and interfere with glucose influx. Changes in glucose transport could affect cell viability and if unchecked, lead to clinical complications, e.g. small bowel necrosis. Purpose: To examine the effect of short (3 days) and long term hypobaric hypoxia (21 days) on GLUT2 content at two sites in the small intestine (jejunum, ileum). Methodology: Two separate groups of rats were studied after 3 and 21 day hypobaric hypoxia. Control rats were maintained at room atmosphere (normoxia 21% O2). Animals in the hypoxic group were placed in hypobaric chambers for 3 or 21 days at 1/2 atmosphere (8-10% O2). Post-euthanasia, tissues were harvested and processed for total protein. Jejunal and ileal GLUT2 content was identified via Western blotting. Proteins were quantified by densitometric analysis and normalized to beta actin. Data are reported in ratio values, GLUT2:beta actin (GLUT2 content) and jejunum: ileum (J:I ratio). Results: An upregulation in GLUT2 content occurred for 3 day hypobaric hypoxic rats at both sites (mean + SD: jejunum 1.53 +/- 1.2, ileum 1.30 +/- 1.08) along with an increase in the J:I ratio (1.40 +/- 1.06) compared to controls (jejunum 1.05 +/- 0.69, ileum 1.06 +/- 0.78; J:I ratio 1.06 +/- 0.50). In contrast, for 21 day hypoxia, jejunal and ileal GLUT2 content was similar (jejunum 0.56 +/- 0.14, ileum 0.58 +/- 0.16) with a reduction in the J/I ratio (1.00 +/- 0.21) when compared to controls (jejunum 0.65 +/- 0.13, ileum 0.56 +/- 0.22; J:I ratio: 1.23 +/- 0.26). Conclusion: The reverse trend in GLUT2 content and J/I ratio to 3 and 21 day hypobaric hypoxia suggests regulation by different mechanisms. Identifying these mechanisms is the next step to understanding the implications of these findings and their application to clinical practice. Funded by NIH NINR 1 K01 NR009787-01
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGlucose Transporter Two Content Varies in the Small Intestine for Three and 21 Day Hypobaric Hypoxiaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160209-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Glucose Transporter Two Content Varies in the Small Intestine for Three and 21 Day Hypobaric Hypoxia</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Fisher, Elaine, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Akron</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, Mary Gladwin Hall 201K, Akron, OH, 44325-3701, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">efisher@uakron.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">J.C. LaManna, Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background and Significance: The small intestine contributes to whole body glucose homeostasis via carrier mediated diffusion through the glucose transporter GLUT2. The gut plays an important role in the protective, restorative, and pathological response to an oxidative stress. Sustained hypoxia may alter GLUT2 transporter content and interfere with glucose influx. Changes in glucose transport could affect cell viability and if unchecked, lead to clinical complications, e.g. small bowel necrosis. Purpose: To examine the effect of short (3 days) and long term hypobaric hypoxia (21 days) on GLUT2 content at two sites in the small intestine (jejunum, ileum). Methodology: Two separate groups of rats were studied after 3 and 21 day hypobaric hypoxia. Control rats were maintained at room atmosphere (normoxia 21% O2). Animals in the hypoxic group were placed in hypobaric chambers for 3 or 21 days at 1/2 atmosphere (8-10% O2). Post-euthanasia, tissues were harvested and processed for total protein. Jejunal and ileal GLUT2 content was identified via Western blotting. Proteins were quantified by densitometric analysis and normalized to beta actin. Data are reported in ratio values, GLUT2:beta actin (GLUT2 content) and jejunum: ileum (J:I ratio). Results: An upregulation in GLUT2 content occurred for 3 day hypobaric hypoxic rats at both sites (mean + SD: jejunum 1.53 +/- 1.2, ileum 1.30 +/- 1.08) along with an increase in the J:I ratio (1.40 +/- 1.06) compared to controls (jejunum 1.05 +/- 0.69, ileum 1.06 +/- 0.78; J:I ratio 1.06 +/- 0.50). In contrast, for 21 day hypoxia, jejunal and ileal GLUT2 content was similar (jejunum 0.56 +/- 0.14, ileum 0.58 +/- 0.16) with a reduction in the J/I ratio (1.00 +/- 0.21) when compared to controls (jejunum 0.65 +/- 0.13, ileum 0.56 +/- 0.22; J:I ratio: 1.23 +/- 0.26). Conclusion: The reverse trend in GLUT2 content and J/I ratio to 3 and 21 day hypobaric hypoxia suggests regulation by different mechanisms. Identifying these mechanisms is the next step to understanding the implications of these findings and their application to clinical practice. Funded by NIH NINR 1 K01 NR009787-01</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:43:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:43:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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