2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160211
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Opioid Pharmacology Knowledge of Nurse Practioners and Physicians
Abstract:
Opioid Pharmacology Knowledge of Nurse Practioners and Physicians
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Golas, Mary, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois
Contact Address:Nursing, St. John, IN, 46373, USA
Co-Authors:N. Prasertsri, S. Ngamkham, J.A. Lundstad, and D. Wilkie, Nursing, University of Illinois, Chicago, IL; and A. Schwartz, College of Nursing & Healthcare Innovation, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ
Aims: Although knowledge about opioids is critical for management of moderate to severe pain and registered nurses (RN) and physicians (MD) are known to lack this knowledge, it is unknown if advance registered nurse practitioners (ARNP) also lack this knowledge. The purpose of this study was to compare ARNP's and MD's knowledge of opioid pharmacology. Methods: Randomly selected MDs and ARNPS from Washington State where ARNPS have prescriptive authority completed a mailed, Opioid Pharmacology Knowledge Questionnaire (possible score, 0-30). Results: Respondents were 174 ARNPs and 77 physicians with active licenses; groups were comparable in age, ethnicity, and experience; approximately half specialized in care of adults or family practice. Of the ARNPs, 66% were master's-prepare; 91% had prescriptive authority. The maximum total score for both groups was 21 points (70%) out of 30 possible. The difference in mean total scores for ARNPs (10 + 5) and physicians (12 + 4) was statistically significant [t (169) = 3.43, p < .01]. Physicians' knowledge of pharmacokinetics, equianalgesic dosing, dosing intervals, and ceiling dose concept was significantly greater than ARNPs. Subjects using references scored significantly higher (15 + 2.6) than those who did not (10.8 + 4.3). Conclusions: The small difference in mean total scores for MD and ARNPs is probably clinically unimportant. The dismally low scores indicate need for additional medical and nursing education to translate the pharmacology knowledge base into safer and more effective pain relief in clinical practice.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOpioid Pharmacology Knowledge of Nurse Practioners and Physiciansen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160211-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Opioid Pharmacology Knowledge of Nurse Practioners and Physicians</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Golas, Mary, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing, St. John, IN, 46373, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mgolas@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">N. Prasertsri, S. Ngamkham, J.A. Lundstad, and D. Wilkie, Nursing, University of Illinois, Chicago, IL; and A. Schwartz, College of Nursing &amp; Healthcare Innovation, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Aims: Although knowledge about opioids is critical for management of moderate to severe pain and registered nurses (RN) and physicians (MD) are known to lack this knowledge, it is unknown if advance registered nurse practitioners (ARNP) also lack this knowledge. The purpose of this study was to compare ARNP's and MD's knowledge of opioid pharmacology. Methods: Randomly selected MDs and ARNPS from Washington State where ARNPS have prescriptive authority completed a mailed, Opioid Pharmacology Knowledge Questionnaire (possible score, 0-30). Results: Respondents were 174 ARNPs and 77 physicians with active licenses; groups were comparable in age, ethnicity, and experience; approximately half specialized in care of adults or family practice. Of the ARNPs, 66% were master's-prepare; 91% had prescriptive authority. The maximum total score for both groups was 21 points (70%) out of 30 possible. The difference in mean total scores for ARNPs (10 + 5) and physicians (12 + 4) was statistically significant [t (169) = 3.43, p &lt; .01]. Physicians' knowledge of pharmacokinetics, equianalgesic dosing, dosing intervals, and ceiling dose concept was significantly greater than ARNPs. Subjects using references scored significantly higher (15 + 2.6) than those who did not (10.8 + 4.3). Conclusions: The small difference in mean total scores for MD and ARNPs is probably clinically unimportant. The dismally low scores indicate need for additional medical and nursing education to translate the pharmacology knowledge base into safer and more effective pain relief in clinical practice.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:43:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:43:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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