2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160215
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Dance Pad Exercise in a School-Based Intervention for Overweight Children
Abstract:
Dance Pad Exercise in a School-Based Intervention for Overweight Children
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Heinzer, Marjorie, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Contact Address:Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA
A reduction in physical exercise along with increased intake of high fat/calorie foods has taken juvenile overweight to staggering levels and created a major public health problem (IOM, 2007; USDHHS, 2006). Mexican-American (MA), Hispanic, and African-American (AA) children are at even higher risk for overweight and future chronic health problems. This quasi-experimental pilot study tested the feasibility and effects of a 3 month dance pad exercise program on body mass index (BMI) of children who were at risk for overweight (>85th percentile) or overweight (>95th percentile). CDC guidelines for BMI of children by age and gender were used to identify percentiles. The study with gender matched treatment and control groups (n=20) was conducted with a culturally diverse sample of 3rd through 5th graders in a Midwest urban public school. The hypothesis was: at risk or overweight children who participate in a routine dance intervention each school day will have a drop in BMI after 3 months of participation. Treatment group children performed 10 minutes of dance pad exercise during the last period each school day during spring semester. Baseline, midpoint, and endpoint BMI data were collected for each subject. Dance exercise directed by a TV video was the only treatment. No attempt was made to monitor or change dietary patterns. Ten boys and 10 girls ages 9 through 12 years representing 10 white, 7 AA, 2 MA, and 1 American Indian/AA cultures participated. Energy balance theory, a physiological framework of energy consumed (nutritional intake) in contrast to the energy expended (physical activity, movement, and exercise), supported this study. Participation in dance pad exercise increases energy expenditure. Decreased BMI occurs when energy expenditure exceeds energy consumed. Data analysis included descriptive statistics and t-tests for BMI change scores. Although suspensions, absences, and school administrative changes interfered with consistency in the number of available exercise days, treatment group children had statistically significant changes in BMI as compared with control group (p=;0.038). Implementing an entertaining video dance pad exercise program in schools can be a major factor in achieving a healthy weight for children who are overweight or at risk.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDance Pad Exercise in a School-Based Intervention for Overweight Childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160215-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Dance Pad Exercise in a School-Based Intervention for Overweight Children</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Heinzer, Marjorie, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">marjorie.heinzer@case.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">A reduction in physical exercise along with increased intake of high fat/calorie foods has taken juvenile overweight to staggering levels and created a major public health problem (IOM, 2007; USDHHS, 2006). Mexican-American (MA), Hispanic, and African-American (AA) children are at even higher risk for overweight and future chronic health problems. This quasi-experimental pilot study tested the feasibility and effects of a 3 month dance pad exercise program on body mass index (BMI) of children who were at risk for overweight (&gt;85th percentile) or overweight (&gt;95th percentile). CDC guidelines for BMI of children by age and gender were used to identify percentiles. The study with gender matched treatment and control groups (n=20) was conducted with a culturally diverse sample of 3rd through 5th graders in a Midwest urban public school. The hypothesis was: at risk or overweight children who participate in a routine dance intervention each school day will have a drop in BMI after 3 months of participation. Treatment group children performed 10 minutes of dance pad exercise during the last period each school day during spring semester. Baseline, midpoint, and endpoint BMI data were collected for each subject. Dance exercise directed by a TV video was the only treatment. No attempt was made to monitor or change dietary patterns. Ten boys and 10 girls ages 9 through 12 years representing 10 white, 7 AA, 2 MA, and 1 American Indian/AA cultures participated. Energy balance theory, a physiological framework of energy consumed (nutritional intake) in contrast to the energy expended (physical activity, movement, and exercise), supported this study. Participation in dance pad exercise increases energy expenditure. Decreased BMI occurs when energy expenditure exceeds energy consumed. Data analysis included descriptive statistics and t-tests for BMI change scores. Although suspensions, absences, and school administrative changes interfered with consistency in the number of available exercise days, treatment group children had statistically significant changes in BMI as compared with control group (p=;0.038). Implementing an entertaining video dance pad exercise program in schools can be a major factor in achieving a healthy weight for children who are overweight or at risk.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:44:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:44:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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