The Impact of Nursing Agency on Women's Self-Care Agency to Manage Urinary Incontinence With Consideration of Body Experience

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160217
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Impact of Nursing Agency on Women's Self-Care Agency to Manage Urinary Incontinence With Consideration of Body Experience
Abstract:
The Impact of Nursing Agency on Women's Self-Care Agency to Manage Urinary Incontinence With Consideration of Body Experience
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Hines, Sandra, PhD, Nursing
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Contact Address:School of Nursing - Div II, 400 N. Ingalls St., Ann Arbor, MI, MI, 48109-0482, USA
Co-Authors:C.M. Sampselle, S. Yeo, C.J. Boyd, and D.L. Ronis, School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; B.L. Fredrickson, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC; and C.J. Boyd, Institute for Research on Women and Gender, University of Michigan
Background: Women who experience urinary incontinence (UI) report that it negatively impacts their quality of life. Research shows that women tend to under-report UI until symptoms are severe and treatment is more challenging. This paradox is examined in the present study which explored the relationship between post-menopausal women's body experience and their self-care agency to manage urinary incontinence, with a particular emphasis on self-objectification. Fredrickson and Roberts' objectification theory is based on the assumption that women, in this culture, are watched and evaluated based on their appearance. Women who internalize the belief that their value derives from their appearance (self-objectify) habitually monitor how they look to others. Falling short of the cultural ideal generates shame and anxiety and may lead to maladaptive behaviors. Methods: Orem's self care deficit theory of nursing provided the framework for a predictive model, with receipt or not of a group session on UI prevention constituting the variable of nursing agency. A convenience sample of 302 post-menopausal women, aged 58 to 84 years was drawn from a larger trial testing an intervention to prevent UI. Cross-sectional survey methodology and path analysis were used to conduct structural equation modeling to test the proposed model. Results: A minor modification of the proposed model produced a well fitting revised model (Sartorra-Bentler scaled chi 2(9)=3.20, p=96, n=235; NFI=.99, NNFI=1.10, CFI=1.00, RMSEA=.00). Results supported the theoretical constructs in the self care deficit theory of nursing demonstrating the positive effect of nursing agency on self-care agency to manage UI (beta=.47, p<.001). Among the proposed consequences of self-objectification, appearance anxiety was the strongest predictor of reduced self-care agency to manage UI (beta=.21, p=.007); this is consistent with previous findings. A limitation noted in this study was the low frequency of UI experienced in the sample. Conclusions: Assessment for symptoms of UI by health care providers and information about this health care problem may promote self-care agency to manage UI in post-menopausal women. Group education about UI may promote self-care agency to manage UI. (NR07618, P.I.: Sampselle)
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Impact of Nursing Agency on Women's Self-Care Agency to Manage Urinary Incontinence With Consideration of Body Experienceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160217-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Impact of Nursing Agency on Women's Self-Care Agency to Manage Urinary Incontinence With Consideration of Body Experience</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hines, Sandra, PhD, Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing - Div II, 400 N. Ingalls St., Ann Arbor, MI, MI, 48109-0482, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sjhh@umich.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">C.M. Sampselle, S. Yeo, C.J. Boyd, and D.L. Ronis, School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; B.L. Fredrickson, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC; and C.J. Boyd, Institute for Research on Women and Gender, University of Michigan</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Women who experience urinary incontinence (UI) report that it negatively impacts their quality of life. Research shows that women tend to under-report UI until symptoms are severe and treatment is more challenging. This paradox is examined in the present study which explored the relationship between post-menopausal women's body experience and their self-care agency to manage urinary incontinence, with a particular emphasis on self-objectification. Fredrickson and Roberts' objectification theory is based on the assumption that women, in this culture, are watched and evaluated based on their appearance. Women who internalize the belief that their value derives from their appearance (self-objectify) habitually monitor how they look to others. Falling short of the cultural ideal generates shame and anxiety and may lead to maladaptive behaviors. Methods: Orem's self care deficit theory of nursing provided the framework for a predictive model, with receipt or not of a group session on UI prevention constituting the variable of nursing agency. A convenience sample of 302 post-menopausal women, aged 58 to 84 years was drawn from a larger trial testing an intervention to prevent UI. Cross-sectional survey methodology and path analysis were used to conduct structural equation modeling to test the proposed model. Results: A minor modification of the proposed model produced a well fitting revised model (Sartorra-Bentler scaled chi 2(9)=3.20, p=96, n=235; NFI=.99, NNFI=1.10, CFI=1.00, RMSEA=.00). Results supported the theoretical constructs in the self care deficit theory of nursing demonstrating the positive effect of nursing agency on self-care agency to manage UI (beta=.47, p&lt;.001). Among the proposed consequences of self-objectification, appearance anxiety was the strongest predictor of reduced self-care agency to manage UI (beta=.21, p=.007); this is consistent with previous findings. A limitation noted in this study was the low frequency of UI experienced in the sample. Conclusions: Assessment for symptoms of UI by health care providers and information about this health care problem may promote self-care agency to manage UI in post-menopausal women. Group education about UI may promote self-care agency to manage UI. (NR07618, P.I.: Sampselle)</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:44:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:44:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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