Elevated Blood Pressure and Restricted Growth in Adult Offspring of an Animal Model of Human Preeclampsia.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160218
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Elevated Blood Pressure and Restricted Growth in Adult Offspring of an Animal Model of Human Preeclampsia.
Abstract:
Elevated Blood Pressure and Restricted Growth in Adult Offspring of an Animal Model of Human Preeclampsia.
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Hines, Tina, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Missouri Kansas City
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Kansas City, MO, 64108, USA
Offspring of women with preeclampsia, particularly low birth weight offspring, have increased risk for development of cardiovascular disease in adulthood. These alterations may be linked to adverse prenatal programming of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal function. The continued validation of a rat model of human preeclampsia has facilitated investigation into the mechanisms for possible effects of an adverse pregnancy on adult disease risk. We tracked body weight and blood pressure from birth into adulthood in offspring of rats with experimental preeclampsia and in offspring of normal pregnancies. Analogous to the known placental insufficiency of preeclampsia, experimental preeclampsia was induced in pregnant rats by restriction of uterine blood flow at the beginning of the third trimester (rat pregnancy ~ 22 days). Normal pregnant rats received sham surgery. Offspring were weighed within 24 hours of birth and at 1 and 4 weeks. At 8, 12, 16 and 20 weeks of age, under isoflurane anesthesia, rats were weighed and instrumented with carotid arterial catheters for measurement of baseline blood pressure and heart rate 3 days later, after full recovery. Litter size was significantly reduced in rats with experimental preeclampsia compared with normal litters (8 +/- 1 vs. 14 +/- 0.6 pups). Offspring of rats with experimental preeclampsia were significantly smaller at birth and 1 week, and differences persisted into adulthood in male and female rats through 16 weeks of age. These differences normalized by 20 weeks of age. Baseline blood pressure was significantly higher in male and female offspring of rats with experimental preeclampsia at 8 and 12 weeks. Hypertension persisted in female, but not male offspring to 20 weeks. The only significant effect of prenatal preeclampsia on heart rate was an increase in heart rate in 20-week-old male offspring. We conclude that the adverse prenatal environment of a preeclampsia-like syndrome in the pregnant rat is associated with restricted growth and high blood pressure in offspring well into adulthood, with some sex-specific differences. These findings have important clinical implications for the management of preeclampsia and for the comprehensive assessment of health status in growing children of women with preeclampsia.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleElevated Blood Pressure and Restricted Growth in Adult Offspring of an Animal Model of Human Preeclampsia.en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160218-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Elevated Blood Pressure and Restricted Growth in Adult Offspring of an Animal Model of Human Preeclampsia.</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hines, Tina, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Missouri Kansas City</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Kansas City, MO, 64108, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hinest@umkc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Offspring of women with preeclampsia, particularly low birth weight offspring, have increased risk for development of cardiovascular disease in adulthood. These alterations may be linked to adverse prenatal programming of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal function. The continued validation of a rat model of human preeclampsia has facilitated investigation into the mechanisms for possible effects of an adverse pregnancy on adult disease risk. We tracked body weight and blood pressure from birth into adulthood in offspring of rats with experimental preeclampsia and in offspring of normal pregnancies. Analogous to the known placental insufficiency of preeclampsia, experimental preeclampsia was induced in pregnant rats by restriction of uterine blood flow at the beginning of the third trimester (rat pregnancy ~ 22 days). Normal pregnant rats received sham surgery. Offspring were weighed within 24 hours of birth and at 1 and 4 weeks. At 8, 12, 16 and 20 weeks of age, under isoflurane anesthesia, rats were weighed and instrumented with carotid arterial catheters for measurement of baseline blood pressure and heart rate 3 days later, after full recovery. Litter size was significantly reduced in rats with experimental preeclampsia compared with normal litters (8 +/- 1 vs. 14 +/- 0.6 pups). Offspring of rats with experimental preeclampsia were significantly smaller at birth and 1 week, and differences persisted into adulthood in male and female rats through 16 weeks of age. These differences normalized by 20 weeks of age. Baseline blood pressure was significantly higher in male and female offspring of rats with experimental preeclampsia at 8 and 12 weeks. Hypertension persisted in female, but not male offspring to 20 weeks. The only significant effect of prenatal preeclampsia on heart rate was an increase in heart rate in 20-week-old male offspring. We conclude that the adverse prenatal environment of a preeclampsia-like syndrome in the pregnant rat is associated with restricted growth and high blood pressure in offspring well into adulthood, with some sex-specific differences. These findings have important clinical implications for the management of preeclampsia and for the comprehensive assessment of health status in growing children of women with preeclampsia.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:44:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:44:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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