Nursing Students' Tobacco Use and Attitudes and Knowledge About Nicotine Replacement Therapy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160219
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing Students' Tobacco Use and Attitudes and Knowledge About Nicotine Replacement Therapy
Abstract:
Nursing Students' Tobacco Use and Attitudes and Knowledge About Nicotine Replacement Therapy
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Houfek, Julia, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nebraska Medical Center
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA
Co-Authors:J.R. Atwood and M. Heuer, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE
Although research shows that nurse-delivered smoking cessation is effective, involvement of nurses in providing tobacco cessation interventions has been limited. Traditionally, interventions to prevent or stop tobacco use have not been viewed as a central part of nursing practice, and thus, are not a focus of nursing education. Knowledge deficits about effective therapies and nurses' own tobacco use may further discourage them from implementing tobacco cessation guidelines. The purpose of this exploratory study was to describe baccalaureate nursing students' tobacco use history and their attitudes and knowledge about nicotine replacement therapy (NRT). Students (N=168) were invited to anonymously complete the valid and reliable Attitudes Toward Nicotine Replacement Therapy Scale (ANRT-12) and a background data form that included questions about tobacco use. Data were analyzed with descriptive and nonparametric statistics. The response rate was 49% (n=83). Students' mean age was 23 years (SD = 3.7). Most were female (95%; n=79), Caucasian (89%; n=74) and single (82%; n=68). Almost half (46%; n=38) were employed in nursing. Six (7%) were current smokers, eight (10%) were former smokers, and 69 (83%) were nonsmokers. Most students (67%; n=56) had experimented with smoking. Current/former smokers were younger at age of first cigarette (X =13.5 vs. 16) than nonsmokers (z = -3.12, p = .002). Both nonsmokers and smokers (20%; n =17) reported multiple forms of tobacco use: cigars (18%; n=15), pipe (7%; n=6) and chew tobacco (16%; n=13). There were significant differences in attitudes and knowledge of NRT based smoking status, but not on amount of nursing education. Smokers indicated more advantages (z = -2.19, p = .03) and knowledge (z =-2.41, p = .02) of NRT than nonsmokers. There were no significant differences in smokers' and nonsmokers' attitudes about drawbacks of NRT. Findings suggest the need for education about the efficacy and use of NRT and other cessation pharmacotherapy in nursing curricula to promote nurses' implementation of tobacco cessation guidelines. Students' early experimentation with cigarettes and use of other forms of tobacco suggest that intensive prevention needs to occur prior to adolescence and address all forms of tobacco use.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing Students' Tobacco Use and Attitudes and Knowledge About Nicotine Replacement Therapyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160219-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nursing Students' Tobacco Use and Attitudes and Knowledge About Nicotine Replacement Therapy</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Houfek, Julia, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nebraska Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jhoufek@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">J.R. Atwood and M. Heuer, College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Although research shows that nurse-delivered smoking cessation is effective, involvement of nurses in providing tobacco cessation interventions has been limited. Traditionally, interventions to prevent or stop tobacco use have not been viewed as a central part of nursing practice, and thus, are not a focus of nursing education. Knowledge deficits about effective therapies and nurses' own tobacco use may further discourage them from implementing tobacco cessation guidelines. The purpose of this exploratory study was to describe baccalaureate nursing students' tobacco use history and their attitudes and knowledge about nicotine replacement therapy (NRT). Students (N=168) were invited to anonymously complete the valid and reliable Attitudes Toward Nicotine Replacement Therapy Scale (ANRT-12) and a background data form that included questions about tobacco use. Data were analyzed with descriptive and nonparametric statistics. The response rate was 49% (n=83). Students' mean age was 23 years (SD = 3.7). Most were female (95%; n=79), Caucasian (89%; n=74) and single (82%; n=68). Almost half (46%; n=38) were employed in nursing. Six (7%) were current smokers, eight (10%) were former smokers, and 69 (83%) were nonsmokers. Most students (67%; n=56) had experimented with smoking. Current/former smokers were younger at age of first cigarette (X =13.5 vs. 16) than nonsmokers (z = -3.12, p = .002). Both nonsmokers and smokers (20%; n =17) reported multiple forms of tobacco use: cigars (18%; n=15), pipe (7%; n=6) and chew tobacco (16%; n=13). There were significant differences in attitudes and knowledge of NRT based smoking status, but not on amount of nursing education. Smokers indicated more advantages (z = -2.19, p = .03) and knowledge (z =-2.41, p = .02) of NRT than nonsmokers. There were no significant differences in smokers' and nonsmokers' attitudes about drawbacks of NRT. Findings suggest the need for education about the efficacy and use of NRT and other cessation pharmacotherapy in nursing curricula to promote nurses' implementation of tobacco cessation guidelines. Students' early experimentation with cigarettes and use of other forms of tobacco suggest that intensive prevention needs to occur prior to adolescence and address all forms of tobacco use.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:44:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:44:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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