2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160224
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A New Measure for Assessing Family Management of Chronic Conditions in Childhood
Abstract:
A New Measure for Assessing Family Management of Chronic Conditions in Childhood
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Knafl, Kathleen, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Oregon Health & Science University
Contact Address:, 3455 Southwest US Veterans Hospital Road, Portland, OR, 97239, USA
Co-Authors:G. Knafl and J. O'Malley, School of Nursing, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR; J. Dixon, M. Grey, School of Nursing, Yale University, New Haven, CT; A. Gallo, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; and J. Deatr
Despite the existence of established instruments for measuring general family processes and characteristics such as conflict and problem solving, no measures exist that assess family condition management and the incorporation of the condition and treatment regimen into family life. The purpose of this presentation is to describe efforts to evaluate the psychometric properties of a new measure of family management of a child's chronic condition, the Family Management Measure (FMM). The FMM was based on the Family Management Style Framework, and testing was completed with a sample of 579 parents from 417 families of children with a wide array of chronic conditions (including 162 families from which two parents participated). Parents responded to the 65-item FMM as well as to measures of family functioning (Family Assessment Device), child adaptation (Eyeberg Child Behavior Inventory), and child functional status (Functional Status Measure II). A combination of exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis methods was used to identify 5 summated scales measuring the dimensions of child identity, concern, difficulty, effort, and manageability. A sixth scale, mutuality, was identified for partnered respondents. Since responses of parents within a family are not independent, calculations of reliability and validity were modified to account for inter-parental correlations. Using these modified formulas, internal consistency reliability for the scales ranged from .72 to .90. Test-retest reliability, based on responses from 65 parents retested within 2-4 weeks, ranged from .75 to .94. Construct validity was supported by significant correlations of weak to moderate strength between each of the scales and each of the related measures, with directions of relationships as expected. Family functioning, child adaptation, and child functional status were positively associated with more normal child identity, manageability, and mutuality and negatively associated with more concern, difficulty, and effort. Correlations with social desirability were nonsignificant for all but the mutuality scale. The analysis supports the reliability and validity of the FMM. The FMM will further researchers' ability to generate knowledge of the family context of childhood chronic conditions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA New Measure for Assessing Family Management of Chronic Conditions in Childhooden_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160224-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A New Measure for Assessing Family Management of Chronic Conditions in Childhood</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Knafl, Kathleen, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Oregon Health &amp; Science University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, 3455 Southwest US Veterans Hospital Road, Portland, OR, 97239, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">knaflk@ohsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">G. Knafl and J. O'Malley, School of Nursing, Oregon Health &amp; Science University, Portland, OR; J. Dixon, M. Grey, School of Nursing, Yale University, New Haven, CT; A. Gallo, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; and J. Deatr</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Despite the existence of established instruments for measuring general family processes and characteristics such as conflict and problem solving, no measures exist that assess family condition management and the incorporation of the condition and treatment regimen into family life. The purpose of this presentation is to describe efforts to evaluate the psychometric properties of a new measure of family management of a child's chronic condition, the Family Management Measure (FMM). The FMM was based on the Family Management Style Framework, and testing was completed with a sample of 579 parents from 417 families of children with a wide array of chronic conditions (including 162 families from which two parents participated). Parents responded to the 65-item FMM as well as to measures of family functioning (Family Assessment Device), child adaptation (Eyeberg Child Behavior Inventory), and child functional status (Functional Status Measure II). A combination of exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis methods was used to identify 5 summated scales measuring the dimensions of child identity, concern, difficulty, effort, and manageability. A sixth scale, mutuality, was identified for partnered respondents. Since responses of parents within a family are not independent, calculations of reliability and validity were modified to account for inter-parental correlations. Using these modified formulas, internal consistency reliability for the scales ranged from .72 to .90. Test-retest reliability, based on responses from 65 parents retested within 2-4 weeks, ranged from .75 to .94. Construct validity was supported by significant correlations of weak to moderate strength between each of the scales and each of the related measures, with directions of relationships as expected. Family functioning, child adaptation, and child functional status were positively associated with more normal child identity, manageability, and mutuality and negatively associated with more concern, difficulty, and effort. Correlations with social desirability were nonsignificant for all but the mutuality scale. The analysis supports the reliability and validity of the FMM. The FMM will further researchers' ability to generate knowledge of the family context of childhood chronic conditions.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:44:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:44:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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